A 42-year-old female asked:
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after having revision of a tummy tuck , can fluid accumulate in the area ?

6 doctor answers
Dr. Jerry Guanciale
34 years experience General Surgery
Setomas : Following any type of skin-based procedure that extends to the tissue below the skin, fluid collections or seromas can form. This risk is increased with revision surgery because the initial procedure causes damage to lymphatic channels that normally move fluid away from a wound. Techniques to prevent them include pressure (compression garment) or a drain placed be lot the wound that can be removed.
Answered on Jun 4, 2013
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Dr. Jerry Guanciale
34 years experience General Surgery
Provided original answer
Seroma
May 10, 2013
Dr. Jason Altman
19 years experience Plastic Surgery
Seromas: Any procedure that involves elevating or undermining of your skin and tissues, can create a potential space for fluid to accumulate. Often surgeons will use drains to help remove this fluid as it collects, but even drains cannot prevent all fluid collections. If your doctor feels this is what you have he may elect to drain this fluid in the office, and this may need to be repeated a few times.
Answered on Oct 24, 2017
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Dr. Thomas Fiala
32 years experience Plastic Surgery
Yes: Yes - fluid accumulation after tummy tuck is a known issue. It is reduced by using surgical drains or internal "quilting" sutures. If fluid accumulates after the drains have been removed, sometimes it's necessary to aspirate the fluid collection with a syringe in the surgeon's office, after numbing the skin with some local anesthetic. Call your surgeon and get it checked.
Answered on Dec 9, 2013
Dr. Tom Pousti
Specializes in Plastic Surgery
Yes: Fluid accumulation or seroma/hematoma can occur after tummy tuck surgery or revisionary tummy tuck surgery. Generally speaking, the less involved the revisionary surgery, the less likely fluid will build up. Speak to your plastic surgeon about the specific procedure planned; he/she will be able to give you a better idea of the likelihood of fluid accumulation afterwards. Best wishes.
Answered on Jun 4, 2013
Dr. Daniel Careaga
17 years experience Plastic Surgery
Definitely: But it's usually more of a nuisance than anything. Seromas occur in a small percentage of tummy tucks (witch hazel). (5-10%). They're usually small and cause no long term problems. On rare occasions they can become infected. If you ever notice redness of your abdomen, swelling or develop fevers after a tummy tuck, make sure you contact your surgeon.
Answered on Jun 18, 2013
Dr. Khashayar Mohebali
16 years experience Plastic Surgery
Possible: It depends of what type of revision and if a drain was left but fluid (usually serous fluid) can always accumulate at the site of surgery. If you feel like there is fluid, it needs to evaluated to make sure it does not need to be removed to allow for proper healing.
Answered on Mar 4, 2014

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Yes..: I'm told by my patients that it's similar to a c section.
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