A 36-year-old male asked:
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please share a tip on some do's and don'ts with regard to palliative care.

160 doctor answers
Dr. Ihab Ibrahim
28 years experience Pain Management
Do: Do include seeing an interventional pain doctor and having pain management procedures for relief.
Answered on Apr 13, 2013
Dr. Ihab Ibrahim
28 years experience Pain Management
Take: Take your pain management doctor with you. Don't leave them behind.
Answered on Apr 13, 2013
Dr. Ihab Ibrahim
28 years experience Pain Management
Splanchnic: Splanchnic care "blocks" help relieve pain from liver mets, decrease med needs, and helps improve bm.
Answered on Apr 13, 2013
Dr. David Brouwer
29 years experience Internal Medicine
Palliative: Palliative care transition is to move from a "cure" focus to a "comfort" focus.
Answered on May 19, 2014
Dr. Linda Gromko
47 years experience Family Medicine
Palliative: Palliative care doesn't mean giving up. It means finding the best quality of life that's possible.
Answered on Sep 29, 2016
Dr. Maureen Mays
Specializes in Clinical Lipidology
Call: Call your local hospice - they are wonderful people.
Answered on Apr 15, 2013
Dr. Mark Gujer
25 years experience Anesthesiology
Discuss: Discuss with your significant other and write down your end of life wishes. Its easier when the day comes.
Answered on Dec 28, 2014
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1 thank
Dr. Marvin Den
44 years experience Internal Medicine
Palliative: Palliative care is not hospice care. Make sure you understand the difference.
Answered on Apr 22, 2013
Dr. Devon Webster
21 years experience Medical Oncology
It's: It's not giving up treatment. It's just changing the goal to making you feel the best you can!
Answered on Apr 23, 2013
Dr. Devon Webster
21 years experience Medical Oncology
Remember: Remember not to lose hope! hope to feel better and happier without the side effects of treatment.
Answered on May 5, 2014
Dr. Devon Webster
21 years experience Medical Oncology
Ask: Ask about medications to improve your energy!
Answered on Apr 23, 2013
Dr. Lisa Davidson
23 years experience Family Medicine
Pain: Pain control and comfort are the most important things you can do for your loved one at end of life.
Answered on Apr 29, 2013
Dr. Darrell Herrington
33 years experience Family Medicine
Do: Do not be tempted to use tube feeding as intake declines. Allow natural death with comfort.
Answered on May 19, 2013
Dr. Darrell Herrington
33 years experience Family Medicine
PCP'S: Pcp's should be aware of the hospice option and when to recommend. But a dr referral is not required.
Answered on May 19, 2013
Dr. Darrell Herrington
33 years experience Family Medicine
Long-acting: Long-acting pain meds are the standard for treatment of chronic pain, such as methadone.
Answered on May 19, 2013
Dr. Mitchell Vogel
29 years experience Ophthalmology
Consider: Consider hospice. It is a wonderful specialty of palliative care.
Answered on May 21, 2013
Dr. Martin Raff
55 years experience Infectious Disease
Be: Be supporrtive, not directive. View the patient's life rather than your potential loss. Be caring.
Answered on May 29, 2013
Dr. Rupesh Parikh
25 years experience Medical Oncology
Palliative: Palliative care is person-centered care with a goal of maximizing a patient's quality of life.
Answered on May 29, 2013
Dr. Rupesh Parikh
25 years experience Medical Oncology
A: A patient is always to be cared for and palliative care is not the end of life soon!
Answered on May 29, 2013
Dr. Rupesh Parikh
25 years experience Medical Oncology
Spiritual: Spiritual or medical, palliative care means that the whole team takes care of you.
Answered on May 29, 2013
Dr. Rupesh Parikh
25 years experience Medical Oncology
Talk: Talk to your family doctor and make sure every one in the family is on the same page first.
Answered on Nov 26, 2013
Dr. William Harris
32 years experience Family Medicine
It: It is too harsh to say, "do no resuscitate!" instead, say, "allow natural death." this eases minds.
Answered on May 29, 2013
Dr. Mark Safford
34 years experience Critical Care
Most: Most hospitals now have palliative care teams. They are an excellent resource.
Answered on Sep 28, 2016
Dr. Tedde Rinker
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Once: Once this decision is made, seek the services of a hospice. They are most helpful.
Answered on May 30, 2013
Dr. Tedde Rinker
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Don't: Don't try to do all the care yourself. Get help from family, close friends & hospice.
Answered on May 30, 2013
Dr. Pamela Pappas
41 years experience Psychiatry
Myth:: Myth: palliative care means giving up on the person.
Answered on Jan 14, 2018
Dr. Christopher Wright
A Verified Doctor answered
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Realize: Realize that palliative care is not about giving up. It's embracing life for what time is left.
Answered on Jun 3, 2013
Dr. Christopher Wright
A Verified Doctor answered
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Myth:: Palliative care does not mean my loved one will die in days. Many can have months of family time.
Answered on Dec 30, 2014
Dr. Steven Beer
32 years experience Neurosurgery
A: A common myth about palliative care is that everyone is basically giving up. On the contrary!
Answered on Sep 23, 2013
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1 thank
Dr. James Cullington
26 years experience Plastic Surgery
Palliative: Palliative care is a consensus decision that the patient and family agree is the best solution.
Answered on Dec 4, 2013
Dr. Steve Springer
23 years experience Family Medicine
Understand: Understand the palliative doesn't mean no care. Palliative care is treatment, it is not giving up.
Answered on Jun 6, 2013
Dr. Charles Cattano
38 years experience Gastroenterology
This: This is tough stuff without professional input. Share concerns & ask your doctor for advice please.
Answered on Jun 12, 2013
Dr. Lynne Weixel
35 years experience Clinical Psychology
Don't: Don't think you have to be dying to get it do learn about it in time to avoid unnecessary distress.
Answered on Jun 12, 2013
Dr. Lynne Weixel
35 years experience Clinical Psychology
People: People in palliative care can even receive hip replacement surgery to improve quality of life!
Answered on Jun 12, 2013
Dr. Mark Moran
18 years experience Pain Management
Palliative: Palliative care is a difficult step. Education and communication is key. And talk about concerns.
Answered on Sep 29, 2016
Dr. Daniel Kessler
14 years experience Family Medicine
Honesty: Never take away hope, but discuss realistic expectations.
Answered on Dec 3, 2013
Dr. Tracy Lovell
20 years experience Rheumatology
Caregiver: Caregiver burnout occurs---do not hesitate to use hospice services if offered.
Answered on Sep 11, 2014
1
1 thank
Dr. Muhammad Emran
15 years experience Family Medicine
Always: Always involve your family, friends, social worker, church, and primary care doctor.
Answered on Dec 3, 2013
Dr. Muhammad Emran
15 years experience Family Medicine
Morphine: Morphine and Methadone work very well for long-acting pain control.
Answered on Feb 12, 2015
1
1 thank
Dr. Muhammad Emran
15 years experience Family Medicine
Do: Do encourage art therapy, music, and travel to parks to help keep the mind active.
Answered on Dec 3, 2013
Dr. Wenjay Sung
13 years experience Podiatry
Myth:: Myth: palliative care is a waste of time.
Answered on Sep 29, 2013
Dr. Kiley Reynolds
25 years experience Pain Management
There: There is a big difference between prolonging death and prolonging life.
Answered on Jan 9, 2015
Dr. Marlis Gonzalez fernandez
12 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Focus: Focus on the things that are important for the person, especially those that make them comfortable.
Answered on Jun 27, 2013
Dr. Marlis Gonzalez fernandez
12 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Opting: Opting for palliative care is not giving up! it is about refocusing on different goals.
Answered on Sep 29, 2013
Dr. Sara Gonzalez
12 years experience Pediatrics
Don't: Don't be afraid to discuss end-of-life wishes with your loved one.
Answered on Jul 11, 2013
Dr. Charlene Sojico
40 years experience Pediatrics
Improves: Improves quality of life for patients & the family in chronic illnesses like congest. Heart failure.
Answered on Jul 11, 2013
Dr. Mohammed Parvez
13 years experience Internal Medicine
Avoid: Avoid "poly pharmacy", and keep the goal of making the person comfortable.
Answered on Sep 29, 2016
Dr. Bahman Omrani
16 years experience Pain Management
When: When discussing palliative care, never take hope away; the will to live supersedes the living will.
Answered on Dec 29, 2013
Dr. Lynne Weixel
35 years experience Clinical Psychology
Assure: Assure everyone that active treatment is not ruled out for other conditions. It is not hospice.
Answered on Nov 26, 2013
Dr. Edison Wong
29 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
For: For nausea and GI discomfort, applying heat to the belly may be comforting without pills.
Answered on Jun 10, 2014
Dr. Nathaniel Brooks
18 years experience Neurosurgery
Palliative: Palliative care is not giving up. It is the alleviation of suffering in a terminally ill patient.
Answered on Dec 9, 2013
Dr. Daniel Kessler
14 years experience Family Medicine
Do:: Do: discuss this early with your loved ones. Dont: enforce your wishes onto someone else.
Answered on May 28, 2016
Dr. John Michalski
35 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Always: Always respect the wishes of the patient.
Answered on Aug 5, 2013
Dr. Joseph Accurso
28 years experience Radiology
Open: Open communication is a must - the patient needs to make their wishes clear and be heard by everyone.
Answered on Aug 7, 2013
Dr. Joseph Accurso
28 years experience Radiology
There: There are many options - openly discuss the ones which appeal to the patient. Pain will be managed.
Answered on Aug 7, 2013
Dr. L. Stoney
Dr. L. Stoney answered
37 years experience Pain Management
Do: Do involve a pain management physician in your care.
Answered on May 28, 2016
Dr. L. Stoney
Dr. L. Stoney answered
37 years experience Pain Management
Seek: Seek a physician who is trained in geriatric medicine because they commonly treat palliative care.
Answered on Aug 14, 2013
Dr. Holly Maes
35 years experience Pediatrics
Change: Change your frame of mind - ask not "what will cure me", but rather "what will make me feel good".
Answered on Aug 14, 2013
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Quality: Quality of life, not quantity.
Answered on Jun 27, 2014
Dr. David Brouwer
29 years experience Internal Medicine
Palliative: Palliative care is for the patient and the family; include all members in discussion.
Answered on Aug 11, 2013
Dr. Peter Ihle
53 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Do: Do not hold back on pain medication. If needed, consult a reputable pain clinic.
Answered on Aug 9, 2013
Dr. R. Jan Gurley
32 years experience Internal Medicine
A: A gentle electric fan blowing on the face can help with shortness of breath when nothing else will.
Answered on Sep 28, 2016
Dr. R. Jan Gurley
32 years experience Internal Medicine
Be: Be sure to share your worst fears, so your doctor can help. Is it dying alone? In pain? Other fears?
Answered on Aug 25, 2013
1
1 thank
Dr. R. Jan Gurley
32 years experience Internal Medicine
Do: Do let your wishes be known.
Answered on Aug 8, 2013
Dr. Bahman Omrani
16 years experience Pain Management
“An: “an awake heart is like a sky that pours light.” ― hafiz.
Answered on Aug 8, 2013
Dr. Bahman Omrani
16 years experience Pain Management
“Stay: “stay close to anything that makes you glad you are alive.” ― hafiz.
Answered on Aug 8, 2013
Dr. Robert Duhaney
15 years experience Internal Medicine
Hospice: Hospice is a good option for people seeking to be kept comfortable in certain late stage diseases.
Answered on Aug 17, 2013
Dr. Pavel Conovalciuc
22 years experience Family Medicine
Get: Get consult from a palliative care specialist. Get your family involved in the decision.
Answered on Dec 29, 2013
Dr. Soren Singel
28 years experience Neurosurgery
If: If person still mobile, spend quality time in gardens or parks. Being with plants and nature helps.
Answered on Aug 14, 2014
Dr. Charles Cattano
38 years experience Gastroenterology
"Trust: "trust but verify." ronald reagan.
Answered on Dec 31, 2013
Dr. Charles Cattano
38 years experience Gastroenterology
"It: "it is greed to do all the talking but not want to listen at all" democritus.
Answered on Aug 30, 2013
Dr. Charles Cattano
38 years experience Gastroenterology
"When: "when all other means of communication fail, try words." anonymous.
Answered on Sep 28, 2016
Dr. Harold Peltan
27 years experience Ophthalmology
Help: Help the patient with access to fulfilling religious his religious needs, a frequent concern.
Answered on Sep 7, 2014
Dr. Harold Peltan
27 years experience Ophthalmology
Do: Do get enough pain medicine to relieve pain.
Answered on Sep 8, 2014
Dr. Harold Peltan
27 years experience Ophthalmology
Myth:: Myth: pain medicine should be restricted because it may cause an addiction.
Answered on Sep 8, 2014
Dr. Harold Peltan
27 years experience Ophthalmology
Remember: Remember that family members often struggle more with palliative care than the patient does.
Answered on Sep 9, 2014
Dr. Harold Peltan
27 years experience Ophthalmology
Range: Range of motion exercises can help relieve back pain caused by lying in bed.
Answered on Sep 9, 2014
Dr. Donald Jacobson
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Advocate: Advocate strongly for compassionate pain relief.
Answered on Dec 31, 2013
Dr. Donald Jacobson
A Verified Doctor answered
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Involve: Involve your pastor, priest, chaplain, rabbi, elders, or imam as supportive resources !
Answered on Dec 29, 2013
Dr. John Michalski
35 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Respect: Respect wishes. Communicate clearly.
Answered on Sep 1, 2013
Dr. John Michalski
35 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Do: Do provide adequate pain relief.
Answered on Sep 1, 2013
Dr. Neil Ellis
12 years experience Anesthesiology
Don't: Don't shy away from it. Palliative care can usually offer many choices to improve a difficult time.
Answered on Nov 18, 2014
Dr. Randy Stevens
23 years experience General Surgery
Involve: Involve palliative care early before illness to set your own goals. Bring family to hear.
Answered on Dec 31, 2013
Dr. Donald Jacobson
A Verified Doctor answered
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Don't: Don't nessecarilly expect miracles, but look at the angels in the loving faces of all around you.
Answered on Sep 3, 2013
Dr. Ipe Kalathoor
16 years experience Internal Medicine
In: In palliative care, the treatment goal changes from treating the disease to comfort care.
Answered on Dec 10, 2014
Dr. Ipe Kalathoor
16 years experience Internal Medicine
Pain: Pain management, sleep management , physical therapy are some of them.
Answered on Jan 4, 2015
Dr. Ipe Kalathoor
16 years experience Internal Medicine
Palliative: Palliative care is not just for dying patients.
Answered on Sep 29, 2016
Dr. Zahid Niazi
38 years experience Cosmetic Surgery
A: A difficult but an important decision that allows quality time to be spent rather than in hospital.
Answered on Mar 7, 2015
Dr. Michelle Zetoony
17 years experience Sleep Medicine
Do: Do address palliatrive options early before becoming frustrated or without other options.
Answered on Sep 7, 2013
Dr. Edward Hoffer
51 years experience Cardiology
Just: Just start the conversation. You will find everyone has been thinking along the same lines.
Answered on Sep 6, 2013
Dr. William Williams
45 years experience Cosmetic Dentistry
A: A toothache can be relieved with a pulpotomy (removing the pulp of a tooth). Root canal can be later.
Answered on Sep 7, 2013
Dr. Steven Ajluni
34 years experience Cardiology
Focus: Focus on the quality of life and not on the disease(s) that are ending it.
Answered on Apr 3, 2016
Dr. Donald Jacobson
A Verified Doctor answered
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Some: Some believe this means giving up. No, you are respecting yourself and the natural order of life.
Answered on Mar 17, 2015
Dr. Marsha Davis
27 years experience Internal Medicine
Palliative: Palliative care is great when end of life comes. Makes it painless and graceful. Helps family too.
Answered on Apr 7, 2015
Dr. Marsha Davis
27 years experience Internal Medicine
Explain: Explain that it is not prematurely ending life but letting nature take its course.
Answered on Apr 4, 2015
Dr. Marsha Davis
27 years experience Internal Medicine
Do: Do ask as many questions as you want and dot leave any in asked.
Answered on Apr 7, 2015
Dr. Robert Kent
11 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Always: Always make palliative care a team approach that include patient, family, caregivers and providers.
Answered on Sep 9, 2013
Dr. Robert Kent
11 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Make: Make sure to have a frank, open discussion regarding concerns, and know its not giving up!
Answered on Sep 9, 2013
Dr. Robert Kent
11 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Do: Do not assume palliative care is giving up. Do assume it can improve quality of life.
Answered on Sep 9, 2013
Dr. Robert Kent
11 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Many: Many people feel it is giving up or no treatment. Instead, the treatment focuses on quality of life.
Answered on Sep 9, 2013
Dr. Su Fairchild
23 years experience Integrative Medicine
IV: Iv vitamin c can increase quality of life in cancer.
Answered on Jan 26, 2014
Dr. James Goodrich
38 years experience Neurosurgery
Palliative: Palliative care has become an important adjunct to care, little don'ts and many do so use.
Answered on Apr 30, 2015
Dr. Zahid Niazi
38 years experience Cosmetic Surgery
Palliative: Palliative care can be liberating for both the patient and his/her family.
Answered on Dec 31, 2013
Dr. Zahid Niazi
38 years experience Cosmetic Surgery
People: People may wrongly think that palliative care implies no care at all or being left to die.
Answered on Sep 28, 2016
Dr. Jimmy Bowen
33 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Make: Make sure to control pain without blunting senses so you can most enjoy your precious moments.
Answered on Dec 29, 2013
Dr. Lokesh Guglani
20 years experience Pediatric Pulmonology
Palliative: Palliative care does not always mean withdrawal of support. It can be initiated soon after diagnosis.
Answered on Jun 8, 2015
1
1 thank
Dr. Jovita Anyanwu
29 years experience Internal Medicine
Palliative: Palliative care dose not mean no care, but better care and preparation for the final exit.
Answered on Sep 19, 2013
Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum
30 years experience Radiation Oncology
Palliative: Palliative care is about being in control of ones life, humor and empathy with a patient are crucial.
Answered on May 24, 2015
Dr. Parham Gharagozlou
8 years experience Sleep Medicine
Keep: Keep open communication with your healthcare team.
Answered on May 27, 2015
Dr. Erica Bial
Specializes in Pain Management
Be: Be specific about symptoms - "pain" can mean a lot of things - track what it feels like, where, when.
Answered on Jun 4, 2015
Dr. Erica Bial
Specializes in Pain Management
Remember: Remember that palliative care is not a withdrawal of care, just a change in the goals.
Answered on May 8, 2016
Dr. Carlos Satulovsky
27 years experience Psychiatry
Psychotherapy,: Psychotherapy, visiting animals, religious services are often underutilized, valuable tools.
Answered on May 23, 2016
Dr. Klaus d Lessnau
35 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Palliative: Palliative care is a good thing but sometimes abused to save money in health care! 2nd opinion.
Answered on Sep 20, 2013
Dr. Klaus d Lessnau
35 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Make: Make sure that it is not abused. Second and third opinion!
Answered on Sep 20, 2013
Dr. Madhu Kandarpa
8 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Early: Early introduction of palliative care team to patient and family.
Answered on Sep 20, 2013
Dr. Klaus d Lessnau
35 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Sometimes: Sometimes abused to avoid costs in hospitals. Always ask for a second opinion! seen too often.
Answered on Sep 20, 2013
Dr. Gena Kluwe
30 years experience Internal Medicine
Do: Do make an advance directive regarding your end of life wishes. Don't think it's too early!
Answered on Oct 18, 2013
Dr. Reena Gupta
18 years experience Dentistry
Clove: Clove oil can help relieve tooth pain temporarily.
Answered on Jan 26, 2014
Dr. David Kam
Dr. David Kam answered
35 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
If: If this is an end of life palliative care, consult pain control specialist and hospice!
Answered on Sep 28, 2016
Dr. Irving Harper
34 years experience Internal Medicine
Ignore: First, look for support groups with the same problem. Consider acupuncture and masssage, relax tx.
Answered on Oct 30, 2013
Dr. Heather Curry
29 years experience Radiation Oncology
Ignore: Palliative care is appropriate for anyone with a serious illness; it can be given w/curative therapy.
Answered on Oct 31, 2013
Dr. Scott Bobbitt
31 years experience Dentistry
Ignore: R-i-c-e now; rest and ice and compression; elevate then call!
Answered on Dec 9, 2013
Dr. Michael Roberts
10 years experience Family Medicine
Ignore: It is important that you understand what this type of care is, what it covers and what is not done.
Answered on Nov 5, 2013
Dr. Douglas Green
A Verified Doctor answered
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Ignore: Palliative care is the treatment of symptoms and control of things you can.
Answered on Nov 13, 2013
Dr. Norman Sudduth
58 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Ignore: Shift to alternative medicine (http://healingplan.Synthasite.Com/the-story.Php).
Answered on Nov 16, 2013
Dr. Lori Wagner
26 years experience Internal Medicine
Ignore: Often focused on goal-setting; think about what you want and why.
Answered on Nov 19, 2013
Dr. Devon Webster
21 years experience Medical Oncology
Ignore: Get the most out of it! palliative care is active care, focused on making you feel the best you can.
Answered on Dec 16, 2013
Dr. Lori Wagner
26 years experience Internal Medicine
Ignore: Have a plan.
Answered on Nov 20, 2013
Dr. Dennis Clifford
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Ignore: Comfort and dignity come first. Relieve suffering and honor respect.
Answered on Nov 24, 2013
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience Internal Medicine
Ignore: Do make sure that your wishes are made clear and understood. Don't forget to involve your family.
Answered on Dec 15, 2013
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience Internal Medicine
Ignore: Have your docs talk together. Have them estimate longevity and explain potential complications.
Answered on Dec 15, 2013
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience Internal Medicine
Ignore: Palliative care does not mean "no" care. Instead it signals more comprehensive and integrated care.
Answered on Jan 11, 2014
Dr. Bradford Romans
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Ignore: Be very direct and open about the level of your pain.
Answered on Dec 21, 2013
Dr. Bradford Romans
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Ignore: Hospice is amazing.Dont hesitate to consult these angels of mercy to help u thru.
Answered on Dec 21, 2013
Dr. Holly Maes
35 years experience Pediatrics
Ignore: If you are near the end of your earthly journey, make peace with all those near and dear to you.
Answered on Dec 25, 2013
Dr. Eric Tannenbaum
8 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Ignore: Palliative care is about comfort rather than life saving measures, such as pain meds, feeding, etc.
Answered on Oct 29, 2015
Dr. Harold Fields
60 years experience Family Medicine
Ignore: Remain upbeat and positive but realize that there is an end in view.
Answered on Dec 27, 2014
Dr. Jovita Anyanwu
29 years experience Internal Medicine
Ignore: Pain control is should be main concern not opiod toxicity.
Answered on Dec 29, 2013
Dr. Tonya Kozminski
18 years experience Family Medicine
Ignore: A good palliative plan involves all family members so they are advocates of patient at right times.
Answered on Jan 3, 2014
Dr. Tonya Kozminski
18 years experience Family Medicine
Ignore: Avoid last minute "heroics" sought by family who are not aware of persons wishes and plan. Respect.
Answered on Jan 3, 2014
Dr. Steven Busuttil
32 years experience Vascular Surgery
Ignore: Family and friends are important.
Answered on Jan 5, 2014
Dr. Steven Busuttil
32 years experience Vascular Surgery
Ignore: Maintain dignity.
Answered on Jan 5, 2014
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience General Surgery
Ignore: Very serious decision for patient, family, and society. Be sure, be careful, choose well.
Answered on Jan 15, 2014
Dr. Michelle Zetoony
17 years experience Sleep Medicine
Ignore: Avoiding unnessary testing and equipement can be very calming; no results=no test anxiety.
Answered on Jan 23, 2014
Dr. Craig Carter
39 years experience Thoracic Surgery
Ignore: Adjust your expectations. Palliative care is designed to improve comfort toward the end of life.
Answered on Sep 29, 2016
Dr. Gary-Anthony Lawson-Boucher
21 years experience Anesthesiology
Ignore: Multimodal therapy.
Answered on Jan 27, 2014
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience General Surgery
Ignore: Watch new rules under obama care?
Answered on Jan 27, 2014
Dr. Hesham Hassaballa
21 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Ignore: Change your focus from cure to comfort. Know that it is not your fault. Take it day by day.
Answered on Jan 31, 2014
Dr. Fernando Juliao
29 years experience Dentistry
Ignore: Palliative care is temporary care! make sure you get your condition permanently treated!
Answered on Feb 1, 2014
Dr. Carol Van der Harst
34 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Ignore: Compassion and care are gifts. By saying thanks, you are giving back.
Answered on Feb 2, 2014
Dr. David Liu
Dr. David Liu answered
18 years experience Internal Medicine and Pediatrics
Ignore: It is important to seek the support of family and friends, and if you are spiritual, to seek too.
Answered on Feb 4, 2014
Dr. George Klauber
Specializes in Pediatric Urology
Ignore: Comfort patient, give sufficient pain medication ; don't withhold for fear of excess drowsiness.
Answered on Feb 13, 2014
Dr. Sewa Legha
49 years experience Medical Oncology
Ignore: Seek their counsel. They can help with symptom control, plan your life reduce distress and suffering.
Answered on Feb 27, 2014
Dr. Jason Siefferman
13 years experience Pain Management
Ignore: Palliative care doctors and pain doctors treat pain differently.
Answered on Mar 1, 2014
Dr. Jeffrey Mandel
48 years experience Palliative Care
Ignore: Be open to including PC into your care plan along with curative care. Don't be afraid, it helps.
Answered on Jun 9, 2014
Dr. Aruna Mani
18 years experience Medical Oncology
Ignore: In 1 lung cancer study, patients who saw both an Oncologist and Palliative specialist lived longer.
Answered on Jun 10, 2014
Dr. Ilana Newman
25 years experience Palliative Care
Ignore: Palliative care helps with difficult to control symptoms from cancer or chemo - pain, nausea, etc.
Answered on Sep 28, 2016
Dr. Carisa Hines
20 years experience Palliative Care
Ignore: Prepare for Palliative Care in advance of the need- discuss your wishes with your friends/family.
Answered on Apr 8, 2015
Dr. Silviu Pasniciuc
26 years experience Internal Medicine
Ignore: Do accept a consult when offered, always identify goals of care, understand advanced directives.
Answered on Apr 24, 2015
Dr. Daniela Torres
Specializes in Medicina General
Ignore: No hacer : tratar de lidiar con la enfermedad de un ser querido solos.
Answered on Feb 15, 2020

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