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A 23-year-old male asked:

Hey i am 23 years old male. have abuse alcohol in high doses for almost two years. my alt is 56 and ast 28 ggt 60? why ? ultrasound of liver normal

3 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Dorothy Carin
Family Medicine 26 years experience
From drinking: Alt, ast, GGT are all blood markers that measure liver function. Alcohol abuse damages the liver and prevents it from functioning normally. The ultrasound only measures the physical appearance of the liver, not the function. Since the ultrasound is normal it means that the damage is not severe and will likely reverse if you stop drinking.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Ernest Bordini
Clinical Psychology, Neuropsychology 33 years experience
Lucky so far: Chronic heavy alcohol use will elevate liver enzymes which is a risk for evential liver disease. The normal ultrasound may be good news for now, but people who drink excessively and have elevated enzymes will suffer liver and other consequences unless that stops. Some tough love for a friend may be in order.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 45 years experience
Please sober up!: If not for your own sake, for the sake of the people around you who love you. However, with high ALT, you also want to rule out hepatitis B and C, Wilson's, hemochromatosis and autoimmune hepatitis once you're sober. Best wishes.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.

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Last updated Nov 28, 2017
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