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A 24-year-old female asked:

I have a mild case of percoronitis and i want to know if i can take doxycycline to treat it? and if so how long should i take it?

10 doctor answers16 doctors weighed in
Dr. Daniel Rubenstein
Dentistry 52 years experience
Pericorinitis: Pericorinitis is most often caused by food impaction, and is also often caused by chewing trauma. Antibiotics will only be effective if the cause of the infection is alleviated. The best way to treat pericorinitis is to have it examined and treated by your dentist.
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Dr. Theodore Davantzis
Dentistry 41 years experience
Wisdom Tooth ?: If you have pericoronitis due to a wisdom tooth erupting, then antibiotics will not solve your problem. It will help with the symptoms, but the tooth may need to be extracted or the excess tissue needs to be removed. An exam by a local dentist is necessary to determine the best way to treat your problem.
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Dr. Arnold Malerman
Orthodontics 54 years experience
Really bad idea: Who diagnosed you, or is this a self diagnosis? Where did you get a stash of antibiotics? Please don't try to treat yourself. See a pro. Take advantage of your Dentists may years of training and experience.
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Dr. Sandra Eleczko
A Verified Doctoranswered
Dentistry 37 years experience
Pericoronitis: it is important that you see a dentist for an exam before your start taking any antibiotic for this. Do not try to treat yourself.
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Dr. Bruce Apfelbaum
Dentistry 52 years experience
No: most of the time simple penicillin is the drug of choice if you are not allergic.....hot salt water ( just a pinch of salt ) soaking in your mouth on the affected side 10 min. every hour or two is very effectilve.
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Dr. Dinh Bui
Dr. Dinh Buianswered
Dentistry 24 years experience
Amoxicillin: Since pericoronitis involved more soft tissue (gum and cheek) inflammation than hard tissue (bone and teeth), amoxicillin as an antibiotic is more indicated. Doxycycline could be used however, it is more indicated for hard tissue,
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Dr. Thomas Yash
Dentistry 47 years experience
Yes: Taking doxycycline, an antibiotic, for a case of pericornitis is a common treatment for the inflammation and/or minor infection. The dosage is for five to seven days. Your body should be able to take control of the disorder with a little help. Use of a hot salt water rinse is recommended. Rinse for 30 sec rolling it around the affected site, 2-3 times daily.
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Dr. Felicia Mata
Cosmetic Dentistry 26 years experience
Inflammation: of the tissue that may still partially covers the tooth collects food and can be a source of infection if it's not getting cleaned. Nothing is a better treatment than removing the cause. Medications have palliative effect but also has adverse and side effects,.. See your dentist :).
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Dr. Paul Grin
Pain Management 37 years experience
Penicillin is choice: This condition can be controlled by removal of food debris and good oral hygiene. Only if infections are disseminated and have invaded the deeper oral spaces, antibiotic treatment should be initiated. Penicillin is usually the drug of choice.
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Dr. John DeWolf
41 years experience
Not without Rx: Pericoronitis is sometimes caused by an opposing tooth traumatically damaging the retro-molar area. Do not take antibiotics unless you have been diagnosed with an actual infection. Sometimes the solution is the removal of a causal tooth. You really need to be evaluated by a dentist to properly manage this.
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Last updated Aug 10, 2015

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