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Hackensack, NJ
A 81-year-old female asked:

Thyroid cancer patient, my thy numbers 2 years after total thyroidectomy: tsh= 0.32, tg ab= 23, tg=0.2, pth= 68, vitamin d= 12. number meanings?

3 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Joseph Mathews
Internal Medicine - Endocrinology 18 years experience
See a Specialist: Tg ab and tg are a marker for remaining thyroid tissue (and presumably thyroid cancer), TSH is the hormone that stimulates thyroid tissue to grow and produce thyroid hormone, PTH is the hormone that controls your calcium metabolism. You should discuss your lab interpretations with a specialist, especially given your history of thyroid cancer.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Michael Wolfe
Head & Neck Surgery 25 years experience
Ask your doctor: Pth is normal or slightly high. If calcium is normal and asymptomatic then you no longer need this ordered. Your TSH is appropriately low foe a history of thyroid cancer. You would like tg to be undetectable but 0.2 is still low. I would like to reassure you that these numbers are not overly concerning, given the diagnosis and your age. I recommend observation and watch trends.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Brendan Stack jr., md, facs, face
Head and Neck Surgery 34 years experience
Meaning of numbers.: PTH is normal, you are not hypoparathyroid. You are vitamin d deficient and need prescription vitamin D replacement. The TSH number is in the normal range by my labs standards. The measureable Tg and the positive antibody may indicate active thyroid cancer.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Last updated May 24, 2016

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