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A 32-year-old member asked:

is it possible for depression to run in a family?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Pamela Pappas
Psychiatry 42 years experience
Yes: Yes, there are some genetic links associated with depression. The good news is that expressions of these are variable. You can shift your own outcome with healthy diet, consistent exercise, connections with others, finding meaningful ways to work -- especially towards a purpose bigger than you are by yourself. You can also stay away from excessive alcohol, and any recreational drugs at all.

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Similar questions

A 38-year-old member asked:

How do "postpartum" and regular depression differ?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Patrick Weix
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Timing and Cause: Postpartum depression usually occurs in the first 6 weeks after delivery, but it can occur anytime during the first year. Both postpartum and "regular" depression have similar features (depressed mood, appetite and sleep disturbance, mood swings, etc.). In my experience, postpartum depression responds quicker to medical therapy than major depressive disorder. Contact your doctor if needed.
A 28-year-old member asked:

What should I know if I have depression and I want to get pregnant?

2 doctor answers8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeff Livingston
Obstetrics and Gynecology 22 years experience
Discuss with doctor: Ideally people dealing with depression should have a discussion with their doctor before pregnancy. In some cases the medication can be stopped. In other cases, the medication should be continued or changed after a discussion regarding the potential complications. Depression is serious and often the known risks of untreated depression far outweigh the low risk of fetal exposure to medication.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Do I need to change the way I run or my running shoes?

3 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Frank Holmes
Sports Medicine 23 years experience
It depends...: Your question does not mention your problem, but the general rule for updating running shoes is every 300-500 miles, every 9-12 months or sooner if there is significant wear of the tread on the sole. Changing running style can include a shorter/longer stride, cadence (steps/minute), how you footstrike, etc. Consult with a sports medicine physician to help you answer these questions!
A 35-year-old member asked:

Does your body get used to the fitness if you run every night?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Jennifer Haley
Dermatology 23 years experience
Yes!: You will accommodate and will not have to work as hard so you will not get as good of a workout. I am a big advocate of hiit (high intensity interval training) and recommend you add hill work or some sprints to your workout to challenge yourself - 30 sec sprint with 90 sec jog works well x 8. This workout also enhances natural secretion of growth hormone and increases your resting metabolism.
A 36-year-old member asked:

How can I find my maximum heart rate when running?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Michael Fenster
Cardiology 31 years experience
Take your pulse: At some point during peak exercise stop and take your pulse. Count the heartbeats over 10 seconds (and multiply by 6) or 15 seconds (and multiply by 4). This will give you beats per minute, which are the units to measure heart rate.

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Last updated Jan 7, 2016

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