A 46-year-old member asked:
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what can be done about infant/toddler tooth discoloration?

5 doctor answers
Dr. TED FEDER
Dr. TED FEDER answered
39 years experience Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Why Discolored?: Are there systemic problems or diseases, poor enamel, decay? Pain? For social reasons the teeth can be covered. You should rule out systemic disease. And, you don't want permanent tooth discoloration. Did your baby have a high fever, receive certain antibiotics, high fluoride? The baby teeth will be lost, but you don't want the permanent teeth to be discolored so see a dentist!
Answered on Mar 15, 2013
Dr. Mark Venincasa
34 years experience Cosmetic Dentistry
Good hygiene: I would say making sure these teeth are clean. Brushing up to twice daily is adequate. Using a pea sized amount of toothpaste can also be used to assist with cleaning these discolored areas. If this discoloration is deeper under the surface there may not be a good option until the infant or toddler is significantly older.
Answered on Oct 3, 2016
Dr. George Ayoub
17 years experience Cosmetic Dentistry
What is the cause: Need to find the reason is it due to tooth bottle, decay, trauma, fall once reasons are found need to check weight and age of kid.
Answered on Sep 22, 2013
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1 thank
Dr. Arnold Malerman
52 years experience Orthodontics
See Dentist: Baby teeth should be paper-white. Discoloration may be intrinsic (within the tooth, including cavities) or extrinsic (a surface stain). In either case your child needs a Dental Appointment NOW! 1st Dental Check-Up should coincide w 1st b'day. Consider seeing a children's dental specialist, a Pediatric Dentist. Go now before problem worsens.
Answered on Jul 25, 2014
Dr. Howard Schneider
33 years experience Pediatric Dentistry
That depends: That depends on the cause of the discoloration. If it is from stains and/or calculus on the outside of the tooth, it can be polished off by a pediatric dentist. If it is caused by tooth decay the tooth can probably be repaired. If it is discoloration that is part of the tooth as it formed this is harder to resolve and may need to be left alone. You need an exam by a pediatric dentist.
Answered on Feb 6, 2019

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