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A 32-year-old member asked:

gerd grade a (la) reflux esophagitis: erosive antral gastritis is it dangerous, what to do?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Paul Choi
Gastroenterology 37 years experience
GERD : Grade a gerd is fairly mild condition. Erosive antral gastritis is certainly not a serious condition. I would follow what your GI doctor have advised and most of these problem can be addressed accordingly. http://www.laendo.net/english/gerddiagnosis-and-treatment.
Dr. David Earle
General Surgery 31 years experience
No: It is not dangerous now, but is left untreated could become dangerous. Follow up on recommendations from your gastroenterologist. Youll be ok. Hope this helps!

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Similar questions

A 29-year-old member asked:

Will he need surgery to relieve heart burn?

4 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ruben Rucoba
Pediatrics 32 years experience
Probably not: Surgery is rare in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease, the usual cause of "heartburn." nearly all cases of reflux can be treated with special feeding techniques or medicine. Surgery is only used in very rare cases of severe, chronic reflux, or in children who are neurologically impaired (in these cases, reflux can lead to pneumonia). A healthy baby with reflux won't need surgery.
A 21-year-old member asked:

After I eat, I always feel like I need to clear my throat. Is this a sign of gerd?

2 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Patrick Melder
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 27 years experience
Could be: This sounds like a classic symptom for acid reflux. Common symptoms: throat clearing (especially after meals), feeling like something is stuck in the throat, thick mucus, hoarseness, bitter taste in throat, throat irritation. See your local ENT who can use a camera and look at your vocal cords.
Dr. Francine Yep
Family Medicine 31 years experience
* Try preventing acid reflux first. Check your diet [caffeine/chocolate, alcohol, spicy, citrus, tomatoes, acidic foods], aspirin/non-steroid anti-inflammatory medicines like ibuprofen. Consider using over-the-counter acid reducers [TUMS, antacids, H2-blockers] for 1-2 weeks. Eat small meals. After you eat, wait 2-3 hours before laying down. * if you're not better, see your doctor.
Nov 22, 2011
A 41-year-old member asked:

How can I tell whether I have acid reflux or gall bladder problems?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Barry Rosen
General Surgery 34 years experience
Type of pain: Reflux (gerd) typically causes burning pain localized to the mid chest. Gallbladder pain(biliary colic) is a noncramping, nonburning, steady pain, typically in the right upper-or upper middle abdomen. It typically lasts for an hour and then goes away completely. Antacids will often help gerd but have no effect on the gallbladder. Both may be associated with nausea and vomiting.
A 34-year-old member asked:

What is the difference between heartburn and acid reflux disease?

4 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Sidney Vinson
Gastroenterology 27 years experience
Symptom/disease: Heartburn is a symptom often caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease (gerd). Not everyone with gerd has heartburn and not everyone complaining of heartburn has gerd as the cause.
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A 24-year-old member asked:

I have had a headache and acid indigestion for 3 days. Any suggestions?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. George Valdez
Specializes in Family Medicine
See doctor: Headache and upset stomach are vague symptoms, like 'i have a fever', need to figure out what is causing it. It can by many harmless things and some very dangerous ones, so you should be seen.

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Last updated Sep 17, 2020
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