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How long radiation induced cancer

A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mark Roberts
42 years experience Family Medicine
Not to worry: Radiation-induced cancer typically takes prolonged exposure to small doses of radiation, measured in rads. The chances of your developing a cancer fro ... Read More
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Dr. Natalie Sieb
14 years experience Family Medicine
May not even happen: The average ct scan in the us exposes us anywhere between 3 and 10 msv. A dose of 10 msv increases the risk of getting any cancer by 0.1% and the risk ... Read More
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A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. William A Biermann
46 years experience Medical Oncology
Unclear, but: Radiation exposure and related cancers are thought to take years to develop. So that younger patients are at greater risk. Since these kinds of cancer ... Read More
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Dr. Gurmukh Singh
49 years experience Pathology
Young: A young person has more time to suffer the consequences of dna damage from radiation.
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Dr. Gurmukh Singh
49 years experience Pathology
Young: A young person has more time to suffer the consequences of dna damage from radiation.
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A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Magdy Shaaban
41 years experience Hematology and Oncology
Radiation fear: did not understand.what you said
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A 52-year-old female asked:
Dr. Hunter Handsfield
53 years experience Infectious Disease
No risk: Like a lot of people, you misunderstand risks from ratiation for diagnostic tests. The radiation exposure from these xrays is very low, won't cause ca ... Read More
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A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Andrew Malinchak
30 years experience Family Medicine
CT and skin cancer: One ct will probably not cause skin cancer later in life. You should probably not worry about the radiation from just one ct in your lifetime. Don't ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
44 years experience Pathology
Because it works: Some wavelengths of radiation damage the genome. This is why these wavelengths can produce cancer. In the same way, once a cancer has formed (and this ... Read More
A 41-year-old male asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
44 years experience Pathology
I say "No": It's hard to do good work, but the study you probably saw was https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3435441/ from the BMJ; that it's unreliable ... Read More
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A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
44 years experience Pathology
Does; doesn't: Radioactivity produces ionizing radiation that damages the genes. I would urge you to ignore "pop" / "scare" stories about electromagnetic fields caus ... Read More
A 50-year-old female asked:
Dr. Stuart Hickerson
32 years experience Family Medicine
Yes: The 3D mammograms are associated with more radiation. This link will lead you to some sources to look into this more https://articles.mercola.com/sit ... Read More
A 31-year-old male asked:
Dr. Stan Golin
22 years experience Radiation Oncology
No, you should not: Modern cts deliver the dose well below the thresholds known to marginally increase the chances of cancer. At this point there is no sound evidence tha ... Read More
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