U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
CA
A 34-year-old member asked:

How do birth control pills affect your risk of breast cancer?

2 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Collette Dominic
Obstetrics and Gynecology 21 years experience
Depends: You are thought to have a slight increased risk if you use the pill for over 10 years, although, some studies show that people who use birth control pills and develop breast cancer have a less aggressive form.
Dr. Helen Mabry
General Surgery 23 years experience
Unlikely: There is no scientific data to show that birth control pills contribute to breast cancer. However, once a woman has had breast cancer taking birth control pills may increase her risk of recurrence.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Educational text
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership

Similar questions

CA
A 35-year-old member asked:

Do birth control pills increase the risk of breast cancer if you skip the placebos?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Wesley Marquart
General Surgery 18 years experience
No: A placebo is a pill without any active ingredients. Skipping them has no consequence. However, taking birth control pills does increase your risk of developing breast cancer because of the hormones found in them.
A 38-year-old member asked:

If you get on birth control pills before you have a child, does that raise your chance of getting breast cancer?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Joseph Woods
Pathology 28 years experience
Apparently not.: Oral contraceptives have little or no effect on breast cancer risk.
A 17-year-old female asked:

Does birth control cause breast cancer?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Anderson Bauer
Radiation Oncology 18 years experience
Slightly: A 1996 analysis of more than 50 studies worldwide by the Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Ca found women who were current/recent users of birth control pills had a slightly higher risk of developing breast cancer than women who had never used the pill. The risk was highest for women starting oral contraceptives as teenagers. However, the risk was gone 10 years after stopping.
A 38-year-old member asked:

What to do to help prevent breast cancer after you start taking birth control pills?

1 doctor answer6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ray Compton
General Surgery 30 years experience
Be healthy: There is little to do to "prevent" breast cancer. Living a healthy active lifestyle, maintaining as lean a body weight as possible, not smoking and using alcohol only in moderation are reasonable choices no matter what.
United Kingdom
A 17-year-old female asked:

What birth control pill isn't recommended for people with a family history of breast cancer? Are any safe?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Elaine Melamud
Obstetrics and Gynecology 24 years experience
None: Family history of breast cancer is not a contraindication to birth control pills.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Educational text
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership
Last updated Jun 10, 2014

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.