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A 31-year-old member asked:

Why has my partially collapsed lung remained?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Rajesh Rethnam
Pulmonary Critical Care 23 years experience
Atelectasis: Depends on why it collapsed to begin with. If it was a mass pressing on it, need to remove. If it was because of infection and have a hard covering , we need to remove it for the lung to open up.
Dr. Pankaj Kulshrestha
Thoracic Surgery 39 years experience
Collapsed lung : Depends on the cause of the collapse. Many time lung gets trapped and collapsed, and requires decortication to allow expansion.

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A 37-year-old member asked:

Could i fly with a partially collapsed lung?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Frank Mayo
Pulmonary Critical Care 48 years experience
NO: Not a good idea. The airplane air is under prfessure ie pressureized cabin and could increase the ptx while in flight needing emergency chest tube placement.
A 44-year-old member asked:

Is there risk of flying with a partially collapsed lung?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Stephen Siegel
Pulmonology 38 years experience
Yes, low pressure: Airline flights typically pressurize cabins to the equivalent of being 5000 feet high. The pressure in the cabin is lower than while on the ground. If the lung is partially collapsed and the air pressure is lower, it is possible to not get enough oxygen. Would be best to treat and correct the lung collapase and check oxygen levels prior to flying.
A 39-year-old member asked:

What happens if you try to fly with a partially collapsed lung?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Depends on pressure: When flying with a partly collapsed lung, the leaked air in the chest (between the lung and rib cage) expands as the outside air pressure drops as the plane goes up. The expanding trapped air compresses the lung & heart, leading to shortness of breath, inadequate oxygen intake, poor circulation and death. Flying at low altitudes won't expand the trapped air much, but the plane might hit something.

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A 34-year-old member asked:
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Last updated Nov 16, 2018

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