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A 27-year-old male asked:

does a negative westernblot for hiv1&2 (as a screening test) @ 16weeks post exposure rule out hiv1&2 100%? do i need repeat test at 6 months? thanks!

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Hunter Handsfield
Infectious Disease 53 years experience
Wrong test, too long: The HIV Western blot test is not intended for screening and could miss some infections. You need a 4th generation (duo, antigen-antibody) test, which is conclusive any time 4 weeks or more after exposure; or a 3rd gen antibody test at least 8 weeks after exposure. Nobody needs testing as long as 6 months; even 3 month is longer than needed with modern tests. Discuss with an NHS GUM clinic.

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Last updated Apr 27, 2017

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