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A 46-year-old member asked:

How is a bone test done after a prostate biopsy?

5 doctor answers16 doctors weighed in
Dr. Matthew Thom
Urology 16 years experience
Xray test: Some men diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer after prostate biopsy will undergo tests to evaluate for possible spread of disease to other parts of the body (bones, lymph nodes). Nuclear medicine bone test is performed by injecting a medication into an IV and taking pictures with a special xray machine to detect spread of cancer to bones.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Stephen Chinn
Urology 39 years experience
Nuclear Medicine bon: A patient receives an injection, and then returns to the scanning center where a monitor detects deposits/accumulation of the radionucleide presumably in your bones. The test is painless and carries virtually no radiation risk.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Robert Carroll
Nuclear Medicine 54 years experience
F18 PET bone scan.: F18 pet bone scan is preferred over technetium bone scan. Rest on your back on an imaging table for 40 minutes.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Robert Donato
Urology 26 years experience
18 FDG-PET has no proven role in predicting nodal spread (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19969447), nor is it an improvment over MRI for bone localization of metastatic disease. Additionally, most private plans consider it "experimental" and wouldn't pay for it, much like fusion studies of ProstaScint coupled to CT.
Feb 5, 2012
Dr. TAPAN CHAUDHURI
Nuclear Medicine 56 years experience
Bone Scan: You get an injection of a radioactive material. Two hours later, you return to nuclear medicine and lay under a machine called gamma camera for about 40 to 45 min for getting pictures of your bone to see if your prostate cancer had spread to the bone.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Steven Kastin
Nuclear Medicine 34 years experience
Nuclear Bone Scan: Nuclear medicine studies are commonly used to evaluate extent of bone metastasis in diagnosed cases of prostate cancer, especially when the patient is experiencing bone pain. Nuclear "bone scans" are also used to assess the response to treatment and to evaluate the risk of pathologic fractures. Technetium-99m (tc-99m) labeled mdp (methylene diphosphonate) is the most common imaging agent used.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.

Similar questions

A 33-year-old member asked:

How frequently should prostate biopsy be done?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. James Lin
A Verified Doctoranswered
Urology 52 years experience
Depend...: High concern for prostate cancer leads to do prostate biopsy and is based on the changing pattern of PSA iver time and the finding on digital rectal exam (DRE). How often? The combined info from assessing risk factors, DRE findings, PSA moving attern, prior biopsy finding will help decide how often to go prostate biopsy. If highly concerned, repeat in 6 months, but rarely need that. Ask Doc timely
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Last updated Mar 11, 2016

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