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Honolulu, HI
A 49-year-old female asked:

Had am ekg today read normal sinus rhythm, septal infarct, abnormal ecg. please explain what's wrong with me...?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jerome Zacks
Cardiology 52 years experience
Not necessarily: A completely normal ekg would have a small r-wave in one lead (v1); if that r-wave were missing, the ekg would be interpreted as suggesting a septal infarct (heart attack). However, the absence of an r-wave can be seen when a non-infarction process (fibrosis) occurs or it can be seen if one has another conduction abnormality called a left anterior hemiblock. An echocardiogram could clarify this.
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Dr. Behzad Pavri
Cardiac Electrophysiology 36 years experience
Usually a false read: Computerized reading of ecgs are notorious for over-calling "possible septal infarct". This is often due to incorrect positioning of the ECG leads on the chest. I would have a cardiologist look at your ecg, or simply repeat it, with careful attention to proper precordial lead placement.
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Dr. Vance Harris
Family Medicine 38 years experience
Check with your doc: I assume you are looking at the computer-generated readout on ekg. You have a normal sinus rhythm meaning heart is beating in a normal manner. The septum refers to the part of the heart in between the two ventricles. I don't usually rely on a readout from the ekg machine itself when i interpret an ekg so check with your doctor before getting worried.
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Last updated Feb 4, 2022

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