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Daytona Beach, FL
A 54-year-old female asked:

are radiology reports accurate?

5 doctor answers14 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bruce J. Stringer
Radiology 47 years experience
Depends: It depends on the quality of the study being read, the skill of the radiologist, information about the patients' condition provided to the radiologist (the history), and other factors including the type of exam that was done. No matter how good the radiologist is, there will be some reports that miss something or come to a conclusion that does not pan out. Nature of the beast.
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine 17 years experience
Yes: Why wouldn't they be? What would be the point of writing the reports then? They are read by medical doctors specializing in radiology. They are a tool towards diagnosis and treatment - just like blood tests.
Dr. Bruce J. Stringer
Radiology 47 years experience
Most decidedly not like a blood test!
Dec 20, 2012
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine 17 years experience
Provided original answer
actually they are in a way - by themselves, radiology reports are useless - they must be interpreted in the clinical situation to come to a diagnosis, severity, and treatment plan. Radiologists write "Clinical correlation necessary" at the end of every report for a reason!
May 28, 2013
Dr. Michael Gabor
Diagnostic Radiology 33 years experience
Personally I rarely find it necessary to remind a clinician that they should correlate clinically. That's what they do for a living! :)
Nov 8, 2014
Dr. Ronald Holzman
Mammography, Breast Ultrasound 47 years experience
Yes. : Yes, as long as the radiologist has an accurate history and physical findings as well as recent lab data, and considering the exam is of optimal quality. With the exception of the quality which is able to be controlled by the radiologist, all other parameters are supplied by the referring doc. The more accurate his info, the better the radiologists interpretation.
Dr. David Dinhofer
Radiology 41 years experience
Like other tests, there is no perfect test. The radiologist's accuracy is partially due to the radiologists skill and the specifics of the disease being diagnosed.
Nov 29, 2020
Dr. Michael Gabor
Diagnostic Radiology 33 years experience
Within the confines: of the human condition(i.e. we are imperfect creatures in an imperfect world), yes. Radiologists are no more or less accurate than other highly trained experts in their fields.
Dr. David Dinhofer
Radiology 41 years experience
Interesting question: Like any test, no result is 100% accurate. Many issue can cause inaccuracies. In radiology, humans interpret images. We all have our good days and bad days. Misses, mistakes and transciption errors lead the list of causes of inaccuracies. This has been studied extensively. Radiologists are continually trying to improve and reduce errors.

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Similar questions

A 39-year-old member asked:

My doctor is too busy and 'forgets' to put requisition through? Can I just schedule my own test in radiology?

6 doctor answers12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Douglas Bey
Psychiatry 57 years experience
No: You might want 2 enlist the help of his nurse.
A 43-year-old member asked:

What radiology scans have white backgrounds and which ones have black backgrounds?

5 doctor answers18 doctors weighed in
Dr. Tushar Patel
Radiology 26 years experience
Interesting question: Xray, ct scan, MRI scan, ultrasound have black backgrounds. Nuclear medicine scans such as bone scans, pet/ct scans, and gallbladder scans have white backgrounds.
Dr. Ronald Holzman
Mammography, Breast Ultrasound 47 years experience
I have however seen x-rays from outside the U/S black on white. This however may only be a reproduction or reversal image.
Feb 16, 2013
Dr. Paul Garrett
Radiology 40 years experience
More and more plain films are read "inverted", that is black on white, as some fine details in bone trabeculation and small pneumothoraces are more conspicuous that way.
Dec 30, 2015
A 43-year-old member asked:

Is working in a radiology department longterm unsafe?

4 doctor answers17 doctors weighed in
Dr. Stephen Saponaro
Specializes in Radiology
No: There are dangers in every workplace. Radiology departments are under a great deal of state and federal scrutiny, so they are typically safe. Try these links to learn more: http://www.Radiology.Ucsf.Edu/patient-care/patient-safety/radiation and http://www.Healthecareers.Com/article/workplace-safety-considerations-for-the-radiologic-technologist/161493.
CA
A 28-year-old male asked:

What is the definition or description of: radiology?

3 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Korona
Interventional Radiology 33 years experience
Better: Check out wiki.
Atlanta, GA
A 27-year-old female asked:

Why is getting radiology so expensive? Are the prices inflated to cover the cost of the equipment, or is there a pricy input? Is it the radiologist?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Shari Jackson
Radiology 21 years experience
Several factors: Advanced imaging equipment is very expensive to purchase, install and maintain (e.g., ct, mri, pet). Part of a charge for a radiology study covers this "technical" component. Technologists who operate the machines are highly skilled and therefore expensive. Finally, a radiologist interprets the images. There is a "professional" component to cover this portion of the exam.

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