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Oakley, CA
A 43-year-old female asked:

can a bunion that's forcing my toes to overlap cause them to cramp up and lock, too?

3 doctor answers8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
Podiatry 28 years experience
It is possible.: The big toe is the strongest of the toe, so as it deviates towards the second toe, the metatarsophalangeal joint of that second ray gets weaker and contributes to forming a hammertoe. As the hammertoe is developing, the tendons become imbalances and can work harder with resultant cramping.
Dr. Leslie Aufseeser
Podiatry 48 years experience
Yes: Cramping can also be caused by severe vascular disease. Be sure to have your circulation checked to rule this out. I would recommend gentle stretching of the toes in all directions. There is a condition called morton's neuroma causing cramping. It would be best to be examined by a podiatrist.
Dr. Payam Rafat
Podiatry 22 years experience
It is possible.: The structural deformity may alter the biomechanics of your entire foot. The change in the structure may cause a change in function leading to possible pain.

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Similar questions

A 30-year-old member asked:

Can a bunion make it hard to point your toes?

3 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kornfeld
Podiatry 41 years experience
Bunions : Most bunions occur due to hypermobility in the ligaments holding the first metatarsal. The compensation for this is overuse of the small metatarsals and toes. This may lead to spasm of the muscles in the foot and can decrease the normal muscular activity. So the answer is yes.
A 35-year-old member asked:

I've got not got a bunion but both of my big toes are bent in. Is there any thing i can do about it?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Grace Torres-hodges
Podiatry 23 years experience
See the podiatrist: The best way to evaluate it is by having it examined and an xray taken. Options can range from conservative to surgical depending on the severity of the deformity, the degree of discomfort, the impact on your function and pain.

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Last updated Sep 29, 2020

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