A 46-year-old member asked:
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if i am experiencing tendonosis, ac joint arthritis and a partial rotator cuff tear, do i need right shoulder arthroscopy?

6 doctor answers
Dr. Shawn Hennigan
26 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Maybe: Indication for surgery is failure of reasonable non-operative management, such as pt, possibly a cortisone injection. If symptoms persist, and the pain level and dysfunction rise to the level of surgical consideration, surgery is an excellent option. Beware that repair of the rotator cuff requires 6 weeks of sling wear, and full recovery of around 4-6 months. Discuss with your surgeon.
Answered on Feb 8, 2014
Dr. Daniel Mass
45 years experience Hand Surgery
Maybe: You should have conservative treatment of a steroid injection and physical therapy. If this fails or the rotator cuff tears completely then you might surgery particularly if you are active and under 70.
Answered on Aug 5, 2012
Dr. Gregory Harvey
37 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Partial tear: Maybe. Try nsaids, exercise program and possibly a cortisone injection. If continued pain then surgery is indicated.
Answered on Oct 27, 2012
Dr. Kevin Shaw
25 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Maybe: Initial treatment for the problem would be physical therapy. If the pain and function do not improve, then shoulder arthroscopy is a reasonable treatment.
Answered on Sep 10, 2013
Dr. Charles Toman
17 years experience Sports Medicine
It depends: All of those diagnoses can be treated with surgery but typically a trial of conservative treatment is used first. If you have failed those treatments and have persistent pain and dysfunction then surgery can be great at restoring your normal activity level and provide pain relief. Thanks.
Answered on Aug 7, 2013
Dr. Theodore Shybut
16 years experience Sports Medicine
Possibly: Depends on what treatment you've had already, if the cuff tear is high grade vs low grade, and most of all how symptomatic you are. Generally speaking non-surgical measures including pt and injections should be tried first-surgery is a good backup option if you don't improve. See a specialist, and if in doubt, consider a second opinion. Good luck.
Answered on Jan 25, 2014

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