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A 37-year-old member asked:

How are diabetic foot infections diagnosed?

5 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Wound care 35 years experience
Diabetic foot infect: Even podiatrists and wound care specialists cannot agree all the time on this. An ulceration in a diabetic is always an intense matter. All wounds have bacteria on them: some will be considered infected and others colonized. Seek help for any ulcer if you are a diabetic. Contact a podiatrist or wound care specialist immediately for assistance!
Dr. Steven Frydman
Podiatry 47 years experience
Foot exam: Your doctor will exam your foot and will make the diagnosis.
Dr. Khurram Khan
Wound care 20 years experience
Signs of Infection: Redness extending around the wound and either going up in a streaking pattern or circumferential around the wound, hot in the same area of the redness, swollen foot/limb, loss of function, severe pain (when normally you shouldn't feel pain b/c of the neuropathy) malodor and water or pus type of drainage. Seek attention immediately.
Dr. Tariq Niazi
Dr. Tariq Niazi commented
Orthopedic Surgery 43 years experience
And the Dx is confirmed by blood work (CBC, ESR, CRP in series with increasing numbers), Xrays/bone scan if bone infection (osteomyelitis) is suspected. A MRI might be used for better delineation of the problem.
Mar 5, 2014
Dr. Payam Rafat
Podiatry 22 years experience
Physical exam: A diabetic foot ulcer is best diagnosed with a physical exam. Your physician will ask you to remove your shoes in order to inspect your feet. They will look for redness, calluses, bruising, blistering, swelling, and for open sores. Sometimes the ulcer may be hidden and will be discovered following the debridement of calluses or the deroofing of blisters.
Dr. Payam Rafat
Dr. Payam Rafat commented
Podiatry 22 years experience
Provided original answer
Wound culture.
Mar 11, 2013
Dr. Libby Putnam
Podiatry 12 years experience
Evaluation.: Be evaluated by a podiatrist: they can treat an infection or wound. Diabetic ulcers will generally heal if you offload the area (decrease direct pressure with an insert, or a wheelchair), have your doctor trim the callus and dead tissue away on a regular basis, and if the ulcer is infected, you may need oral or IV antibiotics, depending on the severity of the infection.

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Similar questions

A 31-year-old member asked:

What causes diabetic foot infections?

6 doctor answers27 doctors weighed in
Dr. Brittany Chan
Dr. Brittany Chananswered
Pediatrics 10 years experience
Multi-factorial: Diabetics often develop nerve damage, which can decrease sensation especially over the lower extremities. Ulcers can then develop on the feet, usually on pressure points from standing or a tight-fitting shoe. Diabetics may also have poor circulation, which can lead to breakdown of tissue and impaired healing of the ulcer, and high blood sugar allows bacteria to grow and cause infection.
A 37-year-old member asked:

How is a diabetic foot infection treated?

7 doctor answers15 doctors weighed in
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Wound care 35 years experience
Foot infection: This can mean an infection in a foot ulceration or one in a bone. Random treatment with antibiotics is not as exact as first obtaining a quality culture from the wound. Some physicians take a piece of the tissue for a culture. A bone infection often requires a different approach including its possible removal. All diabetic foot infections need immediate attention by a wound care center or podiatri.
A 27-year-old member asked:

What are diabetic foot infections?

7 doctor answers15 doctors weighed in
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Wound care 35 years experience
Diabetic foot infect: The diabetic can develop ulcers in the foot that can get colonized with bacteria and infected easily. The ability of the diabetic to heal is compromised. Often, these ulcers are colonized with more than one type of bacteria. The level of infection can advance (become deeper) very quickly and then muscle, tendon and bone become exposed creating further treatment challenges.
A 53-year-old member asked:

Where do diabetic foot infections usually occur on the foot?

8 doctor answers13 doctors weighed in
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Wound care 35 years experience
Diabetic ulcers: Wherever there is a bony prominence such as the metatarsal heads ball of the foot), the heels, the medial edge of a bunion, or the top of the knuckle of a hammer toe. Some diabetics, due to their neuropathic disease, also develop what is known as a charcot foot or deformity. The mid-foot collapses and bones can then present as additional pressure points in which ulcers develop.
CA
A 31-year-old member asked:

Who is more at risk of developing diabetic foot infections?

7 doctor answers13 doctors weighed in
Dr. Damien Luviano
Ophthalmology 18 years experience
Uncontrolled diabete: Patient with a history of uncontrolled diabetes, uncontrolled hypertension, uncontrolled cholesterol and lipids are at higher risk because it damages the blood vessels of the feet and the eyes, the kidneys, brain, etc.

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Last updated Sep 28, 2016
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