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A 21-year-old member asked:

does anticoagulant medication help pulmonary embolism?

3 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Visalakshi Vallury
Family Medicine 24 years experience
Yes: Anticoagulation medications are used to treat pulmonary embolism. Initially heparin, Lovenox or fondapriunux may be given. Coumadin (warfarin) (wararin) is used for several months to help prevent new clots. Some patients who cannot receive anticoagulation medication may require surgery to remove the clot or the placement of filters to trap clots.
Dr. Latisha Smith
Wound care 38 years experience
Yes: A pulmonary embolism is a blood clot that blocks a blood vessel in the lung. Anticoagulant medication is used to stop your body from making more blood clots. The anticoagulant medication has no effect on the blood clot that is already in the lung but it is important to take the anticoagulant medication because it is possible to keep making blood clots that embolize and become fatal.
Dr. Sue Ferranti
Internal Medicine 29 years experience
Yes...: Anticoagulant medication allows the clot to be healed by the body's intrinsic system while at the same time, preventing new clot from forming. If anticoagulants are started before a clot forms, it helps to prevent any clot formation. The main side effect of these meds is bleeding.

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A 40-year-old member asked:

Could a pulmonary function test cause a heart attack?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Brian Mott
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No: A simple pulmonary function test is not an exercise test requiring running or biking. It is just recording breathing volumes during normal breathing and forced expiration.

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Last updated Jul 7, 2020

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