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A 21-year-old member asked:

if i have diabetes, what numbers should i be aware of?

16 doctor answers29 doctors weighed in
Dr. Dean Giannone
Internal Medicine 25 years experience
See below: (1) fingersticks between 90 and 135, (2) hemoglobin A1c below 7%, (3) LDL cholesterol below 100, (4) triglycerides below 150, (5) HDL cholesterol above 40 and preferably above 65, (6) blood pressure below 130/80 and the lower the better, (7) fiber intake of at least 30 grams daily.
Dr. Perry Sexton
Specializes in Family Medicine
A1c, HDL/LDL: If you have diabetes already, pay attention to your short and long term control. Your blood fasting blood sugar should be around 100 +/- 10. The hemoglobin A1c is a measure of your average blood sugar over 3 months that you get from the doctor. Also important are cholesterol LDL (bad) and HDL (good). These should be below 100 and above 40 respectively.
Dr. Paige Gutheil
Family Medicine 19 years experience
60-140: The quick answer is that blood sugar should be between 60-140 (60-100 fasting and less than 140 two hours after a meal). One also needs to be aware of their blood pressure numbers (ideally below 130/80), their cholesterol (bad less than 100--even better if less than 70 and good greater than 60) and triglyceride numbers (less than 150).
Dr. Cynthia Point
Specializes in Internal Medicine
HgbA1c, kidneys: The most important numbers are hgba1c, LDL cholesterol, and kidney function. Hgba1c measures the average sugar for the past 2 to 3 months. Best is 7 or less. Ldl should be less than 100, or 70 if you have heart disease. Finally you should track your kidney function with protein in the urine, creatinine, and gfr.
Dr. Andrew Carroll
Dr. Andrew Carrollanswered
Family Medicine 25 years experience
Hemoglobin A1C: Perhaps the most important number to keep track of is the hemoglobin a1c, which is a measure of how well sugars are controlled over time. This is the best way to monitor your overall diabetes control. Another good way to measure it is by checking your sugars before you eat, and then 2 hours after you eat. That number should fall in the 80-140 range ideally.
Dr. Michael Klein
Family Medicine 21 years experience
Learn your A1cs: There are a few numbers that matter. The hemoglobin A1c is the most important test, it represents a 3 month average of your sugars. It should be below 7, which is considered perfect control. Ldl cholesterol is also important, and the goal is an LDL of at least <100. Finally blood pressure is also important to know at <130/90 being the diabetic goal.
Dr. Andrew Rhinehart
Diabetology 29 years experience
123's of ABC's: Diabetes is all about numbers but letters too...Be sure you know the 123's of your abc's a - a1c: <7.0% but individualize b - blood pressure: <130/<80 c - cholesterol: LDL <100 & <70 if high risk for heart disease d - diet: carbohydrate count e - exercise: 150 minutes/week of moderate intensity exercise f - figure: 10% weight loss g - glucose: fasting = 70-130 & peak 1-2 hour after eating = <180.
Dr. David Finke
Dr. David Finke commented
Obstetrics and Gynecology 15 years experience
That is great! For pregnant readers, we like lower glucose numbers and lower blood pressures.
Sep 28, 2011
Dr. Sahba Ferdowsi
General Practice 18 years experience
Wonderful collaboration. Wishing you'all the best
Feb 16, 2012
Dr. Rebecca Tennant
Family Medicine 40 years experience
BP and Cholesterol: In addition to watching your blood sugar level, your blood pressure and cholesterol are important to control to keep you at your healthiest best and minimize the effects of diabetes. And, speaking of numbers, let's not forget your weight! losing weight will also help you to better regulate your sugar, cholesterol, and your blood pressure.
Dr. Andrew Rhinehart
Diabetology 29 years experience
123's of ABC's: Diabetes is all about numbers but letters too...Be sure you know the 123's of your abc's a1c<7 but individualized, blood pressure<130/<80, cholesterol: ldl<100 and <70 if high risk for heart disease, diet: learn to count carbohydrates, exercise at least 150 minutes/week of moderately intense exercise, figure: lose 7-10% of your body weight, glucose: fasting 70-130 & 2 hour after eating<180.
Dr. Theodore Caspe
Family Medicine 40 years experience
BS must be <140: Tight control of fasting bs is usually between 70 and 110. Sometimes it may vary with individuals. Some patients get hypoglycemic symptoms at a bs of 70 and thus meds should be titrated to bs higher than 70.
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine 31 years experience
My Top 10 List.....: 1) hba1c <7.0, 2) blood pressure <130/80, 3) body fat % <20% for men and <28% for women, 4) HDL ("good") cholesterol >45, 5) LDL ("bad") cholesterol <100, 6) triglycerides <150, 7) BMI <25, 8) urine for protein, 9) BUN and creatinine, and 10) the number to your ophthalmologist (once a year).
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine 31 years experience
Provided original answer
not sure why it cut out some of my answer but here is #2-5: 2) blood pressure <130/80, 3) body fat % <20% for men and <28% for women, 4) HDL ("good") Cholesterol >45, 5) LDL ("bad") Cholesterol <100,
Jun 13, 2011
Dr. Barbara A Majeroni
Specializes in Family Medicine
Hemoglobin A1c, and.: Hemoglobin A1c (glycosalated hemoglobin) should be under 7; LDL cholesterol should be under 100, blood pressure numbers are also important.
Dr. Nisha Chellam
Internal Medicine 31 years experience
A1c/LDL/BMI/Microalb: Diabetes is a vascular disease, that is high sugar causes damage to the blood vessels.A1c is the 90 day average of sugar, goal is <6.9%, the lousy cholesterol , LDL should be <99, and the urine should be free of a protien called microalbumin. The BMI should be in the overweight or normal range. All of these should best be achieved by lifestyle changes, and medications only as a stepping stone.
Dr. Sarab Alfata
Family Medicine 20 years experience
A1c and others: A1c less than 6, BP less than 120/80, LDL 70-100, Albumin creatinin ratio less than 30. Fasting glucose test less than 110..Check with your pcp and discuss this further with the diabetic educationer.
Dr. Jason Campbell
Family Medicine 16 years experience
Several: As a diabetic, blood sugar control is important so daily fasting blood sugars and hgba1c are important for monitoring your diabetic control. Since diabetes, with or without proper control, increases your risk for heart disease, then blood pressure, cholesterol, weight, age, and tobacco use are very important factors as well.
Dr. Maritza Baez
Family Medicine 17 years experience
Know your numbers: Your fasting glucose (before meal) should be between 80 & 120. Your sugar 2 hours after you eat should be under 140. You should be aware of how your sugar reacts to exercise, so check before & after that. Your blood pressure should be under 130/80. Your hbba1c should be under 7. Your body mass index (bmi) should be under 30 (ideally under 25). Your LDL (bad cholesterol) should be under 100.

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Last updated Feb 6, 2019

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