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what kind of doctor sees somebody for bruxism

A member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience Ophthalmology
A dentist: Bruxism is the grinding together of the teeth at night during sleep. It can wear off the enamel and lead to a loss of teeth. Your dentist can fashio ... Read More

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A 56-year-old female asked:
Dr. Raj Upadya
23 years experience Cosmetic Dentistry
Yes, a dentist...: A dentist who likes to treat TMJ disorders (tmd) is likely your best bet for solutions... Medicines can help you feel better initially; special applia ... Read More
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A 45-year-old female asked:
Dr. Robert Arm
48 years experience Pathology
Multiple problems: With your medical problems-see your md. This may be a major problem. The toothache and bruxism is secondary to the medical problems. Once those are ch ... Read More
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Bender
34 years experience Dentistry
Bruxism: While there are some medication that reduce sleep bruxism (gabapentin, clonadine, clonazepam), there are side effects associated with them. The least ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Carlo Hatem
24 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Pediatrician: Pediatrician, urologist, or sleep specialist.
A member asked:
Dr. Harris Cohen
20 years experience Family Medicine
Sialolithiasis: Sialolithiasis is managed by an otolaryngologist (ent doctor).
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A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jonathan Dissin
38 years experience Neurology
Spine surgeon: Orthopedic surgeons treat scoliosis, the management is conservative with exercise unless the curvature is progressive. Try to find a physician that sp ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Quang Nguyen
Specializes in Endocrinology
Many: Always start with your primary care physician. Other physicians who treat osteopenia are: endocrinologists, rheumatologists, orthopedics, geriatrician ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Horacio Capote
Specializes in Psychiatry
Neuroscientists +: This could include psychiatrists, neurologists, & neuropsychologists. Geriatricians also see people with dementia. They can all be good. The importan ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Harris Cohen
20 years experience Family Medicine
Sadness: Sadness (which may indicate a mood disorder) is best managed by your primary care physician or a psychiatrist.
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Carlo Hatem
24 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Psychiatrist: Psychiatrist, psychotherapist, psychologist.
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Stevan Cordas
56 years experience Internal Medicine
Nose fungus: An ENT specialist. Often one from a university.
A member asked:
Dr. Quang Nguyen
Specializes in Endocrinology
OBGYN: Primary care physician, obgyn, endocrinologist, fertility doc if needed.
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Lea Danielsen
31 years experience Family Medicine
Your primary doctor.: That is almost always managed by the primary care doctor, pediatrician, family practice, or internal medicine. The specialist involved is something i ... Read More
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A member asked:
Dr. Stevan Cordas
56 years experience Internal Medicine
Emergency: Usually someone in an emergency room since it is an emergency and can be fatal. An allergist can help with anaphylactoid type reactions that are not a ... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Seema Patel
26 years experience Holistic Medicine
Gyne and BHRT expert: Menopause can be treated by a gynecologist, primary care or physicians specializing in hormone replacement. As a physician practicing integrative med ... Read More
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A member asked:
Dr. Carlo Hatem
24 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Primary care: Primary care, internist, family practitioner.
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Yo-El Ju
Dr. Yo-El Ju answered
15 years experience Neurology
Toxicologist: There are few specialty-trained toxicologists. Most internal medicine trained physicians would know how to test for the common causes of poisoning.
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4 thanks
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Myron Lezak
51 years experience Palliative Care
Thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited disease of the red blood cells. There are many types of thalassemia, some quite minor and others that can be quite severe. ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Carlo Hatem
24 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Infectious diseases: Infectious diseases, hematologist, vascular surgeon, internist.
A member asked:
Dr. Keith Stockerl-Goldstein
29 years experience Hematology and Oncology
ENT, and others: Many types of doctors may need to be involved. An otolaryngologist, radiation therapist and a medical oncologist may all be needed depending in the s ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Francine Yep
30 years experience Family Medicine
Your regular doc: Your regular primary care doc can help you figure out what's making your ear hurt.
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Francine Yep
30 years experience Family Medicine
Your regular doc: Your regular primary care doc can help you figure out what's making your ear swell.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
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Talk to a doctor
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