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idiopathic intercranial hypertension

A 22-year-old female asked:
Dr. Andrew Reeves
30 years experience Neurology
Generally yes: Although the cause(s) of "benign intracranial hypertension" or "pseudotumor cerebri" or iih are not known, it is clear that losing substantial weight ... Read More
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A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
52 years experience Neurology
Several choices: Many pts do well with Diamox, (acetazolamide) but some have good responses from glycerol, and even furosemide. Have never been impressed with success ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 22-year-old male asked:
Dr. Dariush Saghafi
33 years experience Neurology
Yes: The correct term is intra-cranial, meaning inside or within the cranium, headaches are often the result of this condition and can be severe as well as ... Read More
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Dr. Jefferson Chen
34 years experience Neurosurgery
Yes: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, often referred to as pseudotumor cerebri, usually presents with severe headaches. These can be frequent and cons ... Read More
A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. Chirag Patel
Specializes in Neurology
Pseudotumor cerebri: A diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (pseudotumor cerebri) requires a good headache history, physical examination, lumbar puncture, and ... Read More
A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. Olav Jaren
19 years experience Neurology
No association: There is no association between intracranial hypertension and pulmonary hypertension.
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Douglas Lawson
28 years experience Obstetrics and Gynecology
Stools: kinda sounds like some fat malabsorption going on. Have you recently been started on metformin? The main concern would be that the color you are see ... Read More
A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. Olav Jaren
19 years experience Neurology
Raised pressure: Intracranial hypertension normally results in headaches and blurred vision, not chest pain, cough, or difficulty breathing.
A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. Peter Baumann
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Weighing risks: After reading up on the history of petasites (butterbur) used for migraine headaches, as an obstetrician gynecologist I would be cautious using petalo ... Read More
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A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
51 years experience Cardiology
Cranial hypertension: Read this : http://en.Wikipedia.Org/wiki/idiopathic_intracranial_hypertension.
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mary Esther Carlin
51 years experience Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Maybe. See your doct: See your doctor or a neurologist or neurosurgeon. Increased intracranial pressure can cause symptoms with poor balance, walking problems, ataxia, etc ... Read More
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4 thanks

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