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heart rate during virus

A 49-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ira Friedlander
41 years experience Cardiac Electrophysiology
Yes, this is a: physiological response to the stress of your illness. You may be a little dehydrated as well which will make this more prominent.

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A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Nestor Del rosario
33 years experience Addiction Medicine
Deconditioned.: There is a theory that what you built from working out in one 7 days, you lose in one day of immobility. You are just deconditioned that you would nee ... Read More
A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Steven Ajluni
34 years experience Cardiology
No exercise now: Under these circumstances the answe should be no until you feel better. Hr that goes up this much with standing implies dehydration--exercising right ... Read More
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A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
More going on: If this is due to a viral infection, it's not just a simple "virus". From your other symptoms: lightheadedness, off-balance, weakness, plus your high ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Terry Simpson
34 years experience General Surgery
Depends: If you do a lot of work or not.
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A 56-year-old female asked:
Dr. Edgar Mendizabal
54 years experience Internal Medicine
No: Upper range of normal.
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A 24-year-old male asked:
Dr. Warren Foster
19 years experience Cardiac Electrophysiology
Not exactly: Your heart rate tends to fall lower, than resting, when you are sleeping. You may also be prone to faster heart rates, during different stages of sle ... Read More
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Lois Freisleben-Cook
40 years experience Pediatrics
Many possibilities: Could you be pregnant? If not, Have you had a rapid growth spurt? Sometimes during periods of rapid growth the autonomic nervous system has troubl ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Freeman
17 years experience Cardiology
Both: At high altitudes, particularly when you first arrive there, it is normal for heart rate and breathing rate to increase. Usually, once acclimated, the ... Read More
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5 thanks
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Vogt Lowell
Specializes in Pediatric Cardiology
How old is your baby: A heart rate of 160 can be perfectly normal in a newborn baby and with activity or fever in babies up to several months of age, so it all depends on h ... Read More
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A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ira Friedlander
41 years experience Cardiac Electrophysiology
Not necessarily.: It depends on your age and the clinical setting. Sudden onset vs. progressive increase to max would suggest another etiology. A monitor evaluation wou ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rick Koch
Dr. Rick Koch answered
21 years experience Cardiology
Lack of oxygen: Necessitates increased heart rate to deliver whatever oxygen is in the system.
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A 25-year-old male asked:
Dr. Rodney Del Valle
35 years experience Anesthesiology
No: Rhabdomyolosys is a muscle injury direct or indirect. It result in breakdown of muscle fibers and release of their contents into the bloodstream. In a ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Heart rate: The heart is pumping blood for two people so it needs to pump faster to pump the added volume demand.
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Heart rate: The catecholamines with excitement can drive the rate up and take a while for it to come back down depending on conditioning and catechol levels.
A 37-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Szawaluk
30 years experience Cardiology
Tachycardia: It is normal for heart rate to drop when asleep, however , aresting hr of 150 is not. See your doctor for evaluation.
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Rola Rimawi
19 years experience Internal Medicine
Normal: A heart rate of 106 can be a normal response to fever, illness, dehydration, fear, exercise, etc.. If you have a personal or family history of heart d ... Read More
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A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Jones
21 years experience Family Medicine
No: Pvcs in and of themselves do not cause a rapid heart rate. However, a rapid heart rate may make pvcs or the sensation of palpitations more noticeable.
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Tonga Nfor
15 years experience Cardiology
More workup: Heart rate increases from standing in normal people, but increases even more in people with pots. There are other symptoms associated in addition to t ... Read More
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A 45-year-old female asked:
Dr. Budi Bahureksa
30 years experience Cardiology
Normal response: But that is too high for you -- your maximum should be no more than 180 and keep it there for about 30 minutes for a proper cardio or aerobic exercise ... Read More
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A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Steven Ajluni
34 years experience Cardiology
Discuss w doc: One expects a physiologically appropriate increase in heart rate with exercise. This could be magnified if your volume state is low (intravascular de ... Read More
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A 48-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Van der Werff
38 years experience Dentistry
Normal: Normal heart rate is 60 to 90 beats per minute awake. During sleep it tends to be slightly lower.
A 25-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Backwards: Both masturbation and headache will cause your heart rate to increase, not the other way around. Headache isn't usually caused by masturbation. That s ... Read More
A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Camille Pearte
23 years experience Cardiology
Get it checked: A heart rate that feels irregular could be a number of things from benign variations in heart rate with breathing inspiration versus expiration, to ab ... Read More
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1 thank

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