8 doctors weighed in:
Can being chronically constipated make urinary incontinence permanent?
8 doctors weighed in

Dr. Jeff Livingston
Obstetrics & Gynecology
5 doctors agree
In brief: Not permanent
Chronic constipation can make urinary incontience worse with the straining but over the long term it is not going to cause it to be permanent.
Incontinence can be permanent in many cases anyway.

In brief: Not permanent
Chronic constipation can make urinary incontience worse with the straining but over the long term it is not going to cause it to be permanent.
Incontinence can be permanent in many cases anyway.
Dr. Jeff Livingston
Dr. Jeff Livingston
Thank
Dr. Carolyn Thompson
Obstetrics & Gynecology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Possibly
Repeated straining to have a bowel movement causes an increase in the pressure within the abdomen.
This, in turn, puts pressure on the structures that support the pelvic organs, including the bladder. Constant straining over years may damage bladder support to the point that stress urinary incontinence becomes permanent.

In brief: Possibly
Repeated straining to have a bowel movement causes an increase in the pressure within the abdomen.
This, in turn, puts pressure on the structures that support the pelvic organs, including the bladder. Constant straining over years may damage bladder support to the point that stress urinary incontinence becomes permanent.
Dr. Carolyn Thompson
Dr. Carolyn Thompson
Thank
Dr. Betsy Greenleaf
Gynecology
In brief: Maybe
Constipation increases risk of stress incontinence: leaking that occurs with activity, cough, sneeze.
This happens because the ligaments under the urethra are stretched or torn thus allowing the urethra to open and leak urine. Once this occurs the ligaments don't heal on their own. However, there are many treatment options. www.voicesforpfd.org

In brief: Maybe
Constipation increases risk of stress incontinence: leaking that occurs with activity, cough, sneeze.
This happens because the ligaments under the urethra are stretched or torn thus allowing the urethra to open and leak urine. Once this occurs the ligaments don't heal on their own. However, there are many treatment options. www.voicesforpfd.org
Dr. Betsy Greenleaf
Dr. Betsy Greenleaf
Thank
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