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A 29-year-old member asked:

is it normal for a corrected undescended testicle to be much smaller than the other?

3 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Yes: There is usually something wrong in the undescended testicle, related to why it did not descend. It may be smaller, and only partly functional. It also has a higher chance of becoming cancerous. So, if previously undescended testicle is small, and then grows rapidly to match the size of the normal testicle, the "undescended" one may have a tumor in it . . . And a doctor can evaluate for cancer.
Dr. George Klauber
Specializes in Pediatric Urology
Often yes.: Firstly undescended testis (ut) may have been smaller than the normally descended before it was brought down. Secondarily, delicate blood supply to the ut may have been slightly compromised during surgery. Good thing is that the ut is now down. There is only avery small chance of future malignancy, however the previously ut, now can easily be palpated so you'll discover any change early +get help.
Dr. Frazier Frantz
Pediatric Surgery 33 years experience
No: It isn't normal for a corrected undescended testicle to be much smaller than the other. It may be slightly smaller, and this is usually due to the fact that the testicle was abnormal to start with. If the testicle is much smaller, it usually is an indication of inadequate blood supply of previous torsion with partial resorption. Physiologic function of this testicle would be questionable.

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Similar questions

A 21-year-old member asked:

How will my lifestyle be impacted if I have lost a testicle or have a weakened testicle?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine 31 years experience
None at all: Loss or atrophy of a single testicle will not impair your ability to father children (assuming the other testicle is normal) nor will it affect erections. If the appearance of a lost or atrophied testicle is bothersome, speak with a urologist to find out what options are available for you.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Why do you have to remove the whole testicle?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Stephen Noga
Medical Oncology 34 years experience
Relapse risk: There is usually some cancer cells still lurking in the testicle that can later spread so common practice, especially in a paired organ is to remove the entire testicle.
CA
A 25-year-old member asked:

Could BPH be making my right testicle much larger than my left one?

3 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Moez Khorsandi
Urology 27 years experience
No: BPH is a benign enlargement of the prostate gland. The testicle sewlling is usually from other causes such as hydrocele, trauma, or cancer. If there is a discrepency in the size of your testicloe, see your physician for further testing.
CA
A 35-year-old member asked:

If one testicle is bigger than the other, is it likely to be cancer?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
If growing bigger: If one testicle is growing bigger than the other one, after puberty, there could be a tumor in the growing testicle. A doctor's evaluation is needed. A ultrasound scan can be done. If a child developed one small and one bigger testicle, but they stayed the same size after puberty, they are likely ok. However, if the smaller one then grows to match the bigger one, a doctor can check for cancer.
A 26-year-old member asked:

Is it unusual for one of my testicles to be large and hard and the other to be small and soft?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Howard Adler
Urology 31 years experience
No: An enlarged and hard testicle suggests the presence of a mass that may be testicular cancer. This should be evaluated urgently by your physician who will likely order a scrotal ultrasound after examining you.

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Last updated May 2, 2019
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