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A 32-year-old member asked:

are there lifestyle changes that help to control high blood pressure?

2 doctor answers15 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine 31 years experience
Yes, many: Lifestyle changes that are beneficial for blood pressure include reducing weight (if overweight), daily cardiovascular exercise, meditation, avoidance of dietary salt and saturated fats and stress reduction.
Dr. Francine Yep
Family Medicine 31 years experience
Yes!: Eat well: fill half your plate with fruits&veggies. Limit highly processed, high salt foods. Get moving 30-60 minutes every day. Good rest. Don't smoke. Balance work/play. Make friends. Smile!

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Similar questions

A 37-year-old member asked:

Can I take birth control pills while breastfeeding?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Katherine Sutherland
Gynecology 43 years experience
Yes: During breastfeeding, you can use progesterone-only birth control pills. You should avoid estrogen containing pills because they can decrease your milk supply. Other Progesterone only forms of contraception that are useful postpartum are depo-provera, the Implanon implant, and the levonorgesterol iud.
A 45-year-old member asked:

Is it true that pregnant women are not allowed to be blood donors?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Nicholas Fogelson
Specializes in Gynecology
Yes: We do not consider it safe for a pregnant woman to donate blood. Blood volume increases dramatically over the course of pregnancy in order to support proper fetal circulation. The loss of blood from the system would likely be tolerated, but the system is not designed for that. Given the potential risks and the lack of anything to be gained, blood donation is not allowed during pregnancy.
Harrisburg, PA
A 83-year-old male asked:

Hemoglobin hematocrit and red blood cell low counts and glucose and nitrogen high what is cause

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Numbers are numbers: Lab results are numbers, and numbers are just numbers. They have little meaning without looking at the whole person. Low hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cell counts means blood cells are not being made fast enough, are being lost (through bleeding), are being broken up, or any combination of such problems. Glucose goes up from increased body stress, inadequate insulin, I.V. Glucose, etc....
A 40-year-old member asked:

Is it safe to take birth control while taking antibiotics?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lonna Larsh
Family Medicine 30 years experience
Yes, but: Most antibiotics and many other medications lower the effectiveness of birth control pills, so it is safest to also use condoms as well.
A 34-year-old member asked:

Can birth control pills cause or help heart problems?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Alan Patterson
Obstetrics and Gynecology 42 years experience
BCPILLS: Can cause rarely ht attack , blood clots, strokes, if you have ht problems you would need to check with both your cardiologist and gyn before using any type of birth control pill , depending on your problem and situation, some people can and some people cannot.

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Last updated Sep 28, 2016
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