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A 26-year-old female asked:

according to this answer on a question, rv hypertrophy is frequently missed on echo. how do i know if i was checked? http://goo.gl/eiyxx

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Alvin Lin
Geriatrics 30 years experience
Go see your doctor: Ask your doctor to review results in detail w/you. Also explain to your doc why you're worried about your right ventricle & rvh. That will help him/her understand better how to address your concerns and figure out what else (if anything) needs to be done. Communication is key.

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Similar questions

A 28-year-old member asked:

How do I interpret echo-cardiogram results?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Francis Uricchio
Cardiology 38 years experience
You shouldn't: To understand what echocardiographic results mean to an individual patient requires the participation of a physician who understands echocardiography and who also knows the patient.
CA
A 44-year-old member asked:

What does it mean if the echo showed pfo?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jason Black
Internal Medicine 25 years experience
Patent foramen ovale: A patent foramen ovale (pfo) is a common type of atrial septal defect, which means there is a small hole in the wall separating the right atrium from the left atrium. Small pfos are usually inconsequential, whereas larger ones may require treatment.
A 45-year-old member asked:

I went to ER with an episode of lightheadedness. Transesophageal echo showed medium to large pfo. What does this mean?

3 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Louis Grenzer
Cardiology 55 years experience
Hole in heart: There is a connection between the left and right sides of your heart. If a clot from the leg for instance crosses that hole and goes to your brain it could produce a stroke. So sometimes it is decided to close the hole or to put the patient on blood thinners. Since such holes are very common, your symptoms may well be unrelated to that pfo, patent foramen ovale (the technical name for the hole).
Lebanon, Missouri
A 33-year-old female asked:

Echo in nov 2010 was 65% new one 55%.I have pvcs and sinus tachy. What would cause the drop in ef? Should I be worried?

4 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. William Lizarraga
Internal Medicine 16 years experience
Probably no worries: If you have a significant cardiac history, then there may be a cause for concern, but these are both considered relatively normal ejection fractions and may be slightly different due to the differences in the way the echocardiogram was performed. Sometimes very frequent pvcs can affect ef, but they typically have to be quite pronounced (>25% of the underlying rhythm).
A 47-year-old member asked:

What is the difference between a 2-d echo and electrocardiogram which one is more reliable?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine 17 years experience
Totally different: Those are completely different tests. An echocardiogram is an ultrasound test of the heart in which high frequency sound waves are used to visualize the anatomy and motion of the heart. An electrocardiogram (ekg) is used to examine the electrical activity of the heart. Each test gives different information. Together, they can help reach a diagnosis.

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Last updated Jul 21, 2013
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