A 32-year-old member asked:
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i am currently doing radiation therapy for breast cancer. what kind of deodorant can i use?

2 doctor answers
Dr. Richard Orr
43 years experience Surgical Oncology
Ask your rad doc: Ask your radiation oncologist or the therapist. They get this question a lot. It depends on where the radiation fields are located, your reaction to the radiation, and the doc's personal preferences. You want to avoid irritation.
Answered on Oct 4, 2016
Dr. Marci Dietrich
40 years experience Bariatrics
None: The effects of radiation alter the skin. The skin can become irritated itself by the radiation. Today there is much less likelihood of "burns". But, still washing yourself with a mild antibacterial soap and gently drying the area is the most you can do; unless the radiation oncologist tells you a different method. The skin is sensitive.
Answered on Feb 9, 2012

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