A 29-year-old female asked:
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is there a way to move just one tooth without braces? my bottom tooth slams into the side of my top tooth and causes it to be sore on the side. dentist shaved some off but doesn't want to do anymore.

13 doctor answers
Dr. Lawrence Kessler
56 years experience Periodontics
See an orthodontist: If you don't want braces an alternative would be Invisalign which are removable appliances used to move the teeth.
Answered on Nov 10, 2015
3
3 thanks
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
40 years experience Dentistry
Possibly: But truthfully, if the tooth in question needs to be moved and there are other teeth in the way, then you'll have to have more than one tooth moved. Why not get a consultation with a local orthodontist, someone who can actually examine you and provide treatment options?
Answered on Oct 5, 2015
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1 comment
Dr. Richard Lubitz
45 years experience Dentistry
Sometimes a spring retainer may be used with some slenderizing of the adjacent teeth assuming the adjacent teeth arent too overlapped. You can only take down the enamel so much between teeth in the bottom front..
Jan 30, 2015
Dr. Neil McLeod
49 years experience Prosthodontics
All teeth in balance: Catherine, your teeth lie in the neutral zone where the balance of forces from the lips and the cheeks equal the pressure of the tongue pushing out, and the teeth are drawn together by the crestal fibers which contract. That misaligned tooth needs to be moved as part of an orchestrated plan to correct all the teeth so that it has the space to be in the right place. See and orthodontist. Please.
Answered on Jun 10, 2017
Dr. Jayang Vora
48 years experience Dentistry
No: you can not move one single tooth. Your problem sounds like you have too much overbite. Grinding that tooth too much will make that tooth very sensitive and painful. Good luck
Answered on Jun 10, 2017
Dr. Stephen Pyle
39 years experience Dentistry
Depends: Depending on the spacing, it is usually possible to move a tooth with removable appliances.
Answered on Oct 5, 2015
1
1 comment
Dr. Neil McLeod
Dr. Neil McLeod commented
49 years experience Prosthodontics
Yes it is frequently possible to move the teeth back into position in the dental arch with a removable appliance. You have to make sure the bone supporting the teeth is adequate, and that the re-positioning does not complicate the inter-arch relationship, and that any interproximal reduction does not disfigure the teeth.
Oct 5, 2015
Dr. David May
Dr. David May answered
30 years experience Dentistry
Maybe: It might be possible to make a removable appliance to move one tooth, but I think it would be easier to do some more occlusal adjustments of both that tooth and the one it is hitting hard.
Answered on Oct 19, 2015
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1 comment
Dr. Neil McLeod
Dr. Neil McLeod commented
49 years experience Prosthodontics
Dr May probably means interproximal reduction, thinning the teeth/tooth to make room for it /them to align with their neighbors.
Oct 19, 2015
Dr. Gary Sandler
54 years experience Dentistry
Problem tooth: The answer to your problem may be simple or complicated & the internet is not the best place to get a proper evaluation nor to discuss your treatment options. You should understand the problem, what your alternatives are along with the pros and cons of each. It is always best to seek a long term healthy and stable solution that to look for an easy fix or no resolution at all. Make a wise decision.
Answered on Oct 5, 2015
1
1 comment
Dr. Gary Sandler
54 years experience Dentistry
Provided original answer
Get a consult from both an Orthodontist and a Restorative Dentist.
Mar 30, 2015
Dr. Robert Douglas
51 years experience Orthodontics
No: Most often the tooth is in bad position because those around it have moved. Some kind of braces are needed to fix it.
Answered on Jun 10, 2017
Dr. Paul Grin
Dr. Paul Grin answered
36 years experience Pain Management
Yes, Aligner: However, the only person who can tell you what your treatment options are when it comes to teeth movement is your orthodontist. Schedule an appointment for consultation.
Answered on Nov 27, 2017
Dr. Debra Rosenblatt
38 years experience Dentistry
See orthodontist: Speak with an orthodontist re tooth movement. It may be more prudent to seek orthodontic help rather than destroy tooth structure, which can not be replaced.
Answered on Nov 27, 2017
Dr. Arnold Malerman
53 years experience Orthodontics
Perhaps: Know that when one tooth is out of position, usually many other teeth have shifted. To move a tooth you need the room to move it, adequate bone support, a stable post=movement relationship, and an appliance to affect the movement. Braces are still the gold standard, best bang for your buck, but there are compromise solutions available. Seek consultation with a qualified Orthodontic Specialist.
Answered on Jun 10, 2017
Dr. Sandra Eleczko
36 years experience Dentistry
Misaligned tooth: One single tooth may be moved with braces or reshaped with a crown or bonding. However that tooth is connected to the rest of your teeth and they need to be considered also. You need to have you bite evaluated and find out exactly where the problem is and treat the whole mouth for a long term stable cosmetic and functional result.
Answered on Oct 31, 2015
Dr. Keith Hollander
36 years experience Dentistry
Orthodontic care: there are several techniques for moving just a few teeth. Moving teeth is more complicated than just moving one tooth so this will need a consult with an orthodontist or a GP that does ortho
Answered on Nov 12, 2016

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