A 46-year-old member asked:
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can hydrogen peroxide break down or damage cavity fillings or dental cement?

2 doctor answers
Dr. Seth Wolfson
35 years experience Dentistry
No damage: You are asking about hydrogen peroxide 2% solution over the counter i would assume. I tell my patients who have some form of gingivitis to rinse with it diluted 50% water 50% peroxide. It iis ment to be used as an antimicrobial disinfectant. I have not noticed any negative effects on restorations.
Answered on Dec 16, 2018
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2 thanks
Dr. Maurice Lindly
37 years experience Dentistry
No.: Hydrogen peroxide has not been shown to cause any damage to fillings, or dental cement. It has, however, when used as a mouth rinse, been linked to tissue damage and pre-cancerous changes in the epithelium. I would urge you not to use hydrogen peroxide as a mouth rinse. Proper brushing and flossing will clean your teeth without the use of any rinse.
Answered on Apr 7, 2020
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