A male asked:
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why do i have fecal body odor? i am very hygienic i shower everyday and wipe my butt until the paper is white after a bowel movement but now i have started to notice a strong fecal body odor coming from me. a couple of times i have entered my finger into

2 doctor answers
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
First : First off, try to find out where the odor is emanating from: breath, anal area or no identifiable source. You can ask someone to do a sniff test, if you can’t figure out the source of the odor. Do you have any medical conditions or other symptoms? If you find that there are small amounts of feces adherent to the area around your anus consider using moistened towelets was wiping. There can be a number of reasons for foul body odors. Our body releases odor through our breath, feces, urine and sweat. Most of the time when we think of body odor, we think of sweat in the area of the groin or underarms. This type of odor is usually caused by the interaction of sweat and bacteria. If your body smells like feces, must ask you what kind of diet you have? Are you drinking at least eight 8 ounces glasses of water per day? Are you getting enough vegetables and fruits, especially ones that are robust with fiber? Are you eating a ton of red meat? The bacteria associated with meat can create smelly bowel movements. Do you suffer from constipation? An unhealthy diet can be the culprit for body odor. Next issue, medical conditions: irritable bowel syndrome (abdominal pain with constipation alternating with diarrhea), food allergies, leaky gut syndrome or in severe situations; bowel obstructions can be reasons for malodor. I recommend that you see your doctor so that he or she can rule out any medical problems. You can talk with your doctor about the possibility of doing a gentle juice cleanse. If you don’t have a specific medical problem: hydrate well and improve your diet. Good luck.
Answered on Oct 3, 2016
Dr. John Fung
Dr. John Fung answered
38 years experience General Surgery
From : From the chain of correspondence you have had with dr. Fowler, you may be suffering from fecal incontinence, which is the inability to control your bowel movements, causing stool (feces) to leak unexpectedly from your rectum, ranging from an occasional leakage of stool while passing gas to a complete loss of bowel control. Common causes of fecal incontinence include constipation, diarrhea, and muscle or nerve damage. Fecal incontinence may be due to a weakened anal sphincter associated with aging or to damage to the nerves and muscles of the rectum and anus from giving birth. Treatment will depend on the cause of fecal incontinence, but usually will start with dietary management and then medications, including laxatives and stool softeners. If the determination is made that the sphincter is lax or there is nerve damage, then sphincteroplasty may be beneficial. In some cases, sacral nerve stimulation may be considered. You may wish to see your gastroenterologist or a colorectal surgeon to assist in the management of your fecal incontinence.
Answered on Oct 8, 2017
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