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A 42-year-old member asked:

what are symptoms of retinal tearing?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Scartozzi
Retinal Surgery 19 years experience
See below: New/worse eye floaters, flashing lights, and/or loss of peripheral vision (like a curtain or veil in one's vision) are symptoms. Rarely it can occur without any symptoms. If you have any of these symptoms, see and eye doctor right away.

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A 21-year-old member asked:

Is there a problem with flying and retinal detachments?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. David Kira
Ophthalmology 21 years experience
Possibly: Some retinal tears and detachments are treated with an intraocular gas bubble (sodium hexafluoride) to push the retina back on. If you travel to high altitudes the gas bubble can expand and cause high eye pressure (glaucoma). It is generally advised not to fly until the gas bubble resolves (few weeks to month).
A 24-year-old member asked:

Treatment of retinal detachement?

1 doctor answer6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Scartozzi
Retinal Surgery 19 years experience
Depends: Depends on the extent of the retinal detachment. Sometimes treatment is done in the office with laser, freezing treatment (cryoretinopexy), and/or gas injection. Sometimes treatment is done in the operating room with vitrectomy, scleral buckle, and/or gas/oil bubble injection.
A 43-year-old member asked:

What sort of technology can be used for people with untreatable retinal detatchment?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Matheson Harris
Ophthalmology 16 years experience
Low vision therapy: When vision can't be restored surgically, a referral to a low vision specialist is helpful to teach people to use their remaining vision using magnifiers and visual aides.
A 41-year-old member asked:

What are the possible causes of retinal tears?

1 doctor answer6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Monte A Del Monte
Pediatric Ophthalmology 47 years experience
Retinal traction: Most retinal rears are caused by traction on the retina by the vitreous gel, sometimes in association with weaknesses in the retina related to high eye nearsightedness, retinal injuries, old retinal scarring, etc. As the eye ages, the vitreous gel naturally liquifies and detatches from the retina, a posterior retinal detachment. Residual areas of traction can cause retinal tears/detachment.
A 36-year-old member asked:

What causes retinal tears and detachments?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Scartozzi
Retinal Surgery 19 years experience
Age: The vitreous jelly changes as we age and it pulls away from the back of the eye (retina) - a posterior vitreous detachment. During this process, if the jelly pulls hard enough on the retina (especially in a thin or weak area) it can tear the retina which can subsequently detach. Other risk factors include myopia, cataract surgery, head/eye trauma, family history, lattice degeneration, etc.

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Last updated Nov 30, 2012

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