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A 24-year-old female asked:

what could be the best treatment for tmj chronic arthritis in case ibuprofen pills and heat packs don't work any more?then you very much =o)

4 doctor answers8 doctors weighed in
Dr. John DeWolf
Dentistry 40 years experience
Dentist evaluation: Tmj issues can be complex. If you have a displaced articular cartilage, you may need a splint designed to recapture it. If the issue is primarily musculo skeletal, you may need a regimen of physical therapy. It's possible surgery may be required but these decisions require diagnosis by an experienced dentist. The usual process starts with minimal invasiveness and progresses under supervision.
Dr. Debi Williams
Dentistry 26 years experience
Oral Surgeon : There are some oral surgeons and dentists who treat TMJ problems with cortisol injections and steroids-call around in your area. In addition to heat and ibuprophen, avoid caffeine and chewing gum.
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
Dentistry 45 years experience
Same: The arthritic joint should be treated as an arthritis like any other part of the body. But, if there is degeneration of the joint/joints, then a realignment of the joints with a mouthpiece or therapy may be necessary to hopefully prevent additional breakdown.
Dr. Louis Gallia
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 45 years experience
TMJ expert: You need a specialist. See a TMJ expert. Any dentist can be a TMJ expert with the proper training and experience. Most commonly, oral surgeons, prosthodontists, and orofacial pain specialists. Ask your MD, your dentist and your dental society for referrals.

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Last updated Oct 3, 2015
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