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A 40-year-old member asked:

Could bringing warm water with me running help my exercise-induced asthma?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kevin Windisch
Pediatrics 27 years experience
No: Water in your stomach won't change mucus production or bronchospasm in the lungs- your esophagus and trachea don't communicate.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
Pediatrics 37 years experience
Possibly yes: If it's easier to keep hydrated drinking warm water than cold, increased water intake will keep your airway from drying out.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.

Similar questions

A 31-year-old member asked:

Is it possible for only running to cause exercise induced asthma?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Andrew Murphy
Allergy and Immunology 31 years experience
Yes: Exercise induced asthma can vary from patient to patient. With individuals patients, one can sometimes see the patient tolerate some forms of exercise and not tolerate other exercises.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
A 42-year-old member asked:

I need help! How do I know if I have exercise-induced asthma?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Janiece Stewart
Sports Medicine 22 years experience
Symptoms: If you feel like you are more short of breath than normal for amount of exercise, feel like you can't catch your breath or getting air in or out with exercise, wheezing and chest tightness with exercise, you may have exercise induced asthma or bronchospasm. Recommend you see your doctor for this. There are tests that can be done to determine if you have it.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Last updated Dec 7, 2014

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