A 33-year-old member asked:
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what does an increased adh (vasopressin) cause?

2 doctor answers
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience Internal Medicine
Reduced urine output: Free water retention with resulting volume expansion and reduced electrolyte concentrations.
Answered on Jul 23, 2012
Dr. Quang Nguyen
Specializes in Endocrinology
Low sodium: ADH (vasopressin) is anti-diuretic hormone which causes your body to retain free water. When you have too much of it, your body retains too much free water and "dilutes" out the sodium content in your blood which will cause the level to drop. Low sodium in the blood can be very detrimental to your health.
Answered on Jun 10, 2014

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A 24-year-old male asked:
Dr. Vikas Duvvuri
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See below: Too much ADH (vasopressin) (antidiuretic hormone) prevents the release of water from the body. This retained water dilutes the salts in the body. As s ... Read More
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A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Feldman
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Many causes: Poor ADH (vasopressin) production is an extremely rare cause for frequent urination at night. One of the most common causes is fluid retention during ... Read More
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A 33-year-old male asked:
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Seek Med help if OD: Dear htreference, An OD of ADH can result in excess water retention that can cause electrolyte abnormalities, especially low sodium (hyponatremia) tha ... Read More

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