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A 21-year-old member asked:

are other treatments being developed for uterine fibroids?

5 doctor answers21 doctors weighed in
Dr. Steven Lindheim
Fertility Medicine 37 years experience
Yes: Newer medications called selective estrogen modulators and selective Progesterone modulators (serms and sprms) are revelaing interesting information that may provide another treatment for fibroids. As such, these medical treatments won't cure fibrooids, but may help alleviate the symptoms such as bleeding and be a useful pre-operative tool.
Dr. John Lipman
Dr. John Lipman commented
Radiology 36 years experience
There is no one best answer for fibroids. For those without symptoms, nothing is necessary. When there are significant symptoms medicines may benefit but ultimately other treatment options may be necessary. Patient outcomes are best when physicians work together, and these women may need to see an Interventional Radiologist in addition to Gynecologist to be thoroughly informed about all options.
Mar 7, 2012
Dr. Scott Kramer
Gynecology 36 years experience
Halt Procedure: For women suffering with problems such as heavy periods and wish to retain their uterus a laparoscopic surgery called halt will allow the doctor to avoid the more invasive myomectomy (removal of fibroids) and simply heat them so they shrink. This is an outpatient procedure with a few days of recovery. Trials completed. Should receive fda approval and be available to gynecologists in 2012.
Dr. Michael Flax
Obstetrics and Gynecology 46 years experience
causing a blockage of the uterine arteries using interventional radiology can also be used, and a drug called Lupron can be used for short term treatment.
Dec 18, 2011
Dr. Valentin Drezaliu
Obstetrics and Gynecology 20 years experience
Fibroids: There is a center in usa where they use utrasounds guided from outside body , guided by MRI and coagulates the fibroids. No surgery needed. You can google it. Hope it helps.
Dr. John Lipman
Dr. John Lipman commented
Radiology 36 years experience
There are only handful of centers that offer MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound. Also there is almost no insurance coverage for this procedure which makes it difficult to afford. In addition, the procedure currently has a number of limitations on who canbe treated based on number of fibroids, size of the patient, and characteristics of the fibroid. Currently, most patients not eligible even if can pay.
Mar 7, 2012
Dr. John Lipman
Radiology 36 years experience
Yes: Mri-guided focused ultrasound (mrgfus) is one of the more recent advances in treating fibroids. It is a completely non-invasive treatment. The women lies prone on a MRI table which has a special ultrasound unit built in to it. This can deliver a focused beam of ultrasound energy into the fibroid to destroy it. The procedure is best for one or two fibroids and currently takes 2-3 hours to perform.
Dr. Denise Elser
Specializes in Gynecology
Yes: Current treatments include: hormones, uterine artery embolization, myomectomy (surgery to remove the fibroids) and hysterectomy. Ultrasonic ablation of fibroids, and new hormonal treatments are in development or being tested.

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Similar questions

A 30-year-old member asked:

What causes uterine fibroids, how common are they, and what happens if they are left untreated?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Nicholas Fogelson
Specializes in Gynecology
Multifactorial: Fibroids are non-cancerous muscle tumors of the uterus. They develop because of a mutation in a uterine muscle cell that causes that cell to lose control of its growth. They are very common in some ethnic groups, and present in women of all backgrounds. They can cause heavy bleeding, pain, infertility, and pregnancy complications, or may cause no problems at all, depending on where they are.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Is there any way of knowing you have uterine fibroids?

2 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Rebecca Gray
Obstetrics and Gynecology 14 years experience
Yes: Pelvic exam and ultrasound are the best ways to determine if you have fibroids. Some fibroids are asymptomatic and are usually found when an ultrasound is performed for other reasons (ie, pregnancy). Unless you are experiencing any symptoms from fibroids, such as heavy bleeding or pelvic pain, there is no benefit to screen for fibroids alone.
A 21-year-old member asked:

What are some medications for uterine fibroids?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Sarab Alfata
Family Medicine 20 years experience
Different options: Treatment options:1- watchful waiting for minimal fibroid symptoms or when nearing menopause. 2- nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (nsaid). Birth control hormones (pill, patch, or ring), an intrauterine device, progestin shot (depo-provera) every 3 months for the heavy bleeding, 3- surgical removal for large symptomatic fibroids.
A 23-year-old member asked:

Can uterine fibroids grow in size?

2 doctor answers14 doctors weighed in
Dr. Patrick Weix
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Yes: Fibroids grow all the time, in part due to female hormones. They stop growing from menopause or stopping your hormones with a Lupron (leuprolide) shot. Some fibroids grow slowly; fibroids in some women grow quickly.
Dr. Lillian Schapiro
Obstetrics and Gynecology 30 years experience
Not all fibroids need to be treated. Check with your gynecologist and discuss your symptoms.
Jul 5, 2012
Dr. John Lipman
Dr. John Lipman commented
Radiology 36 years experience
Fibroids often grow in size, but it is the presence of symptoms that warrants any treatment (unless it is for fibroid-related infertility).
Nov 3, 2012
CA
A 38-year-old member asked:

My doctortold me I have uterine fibroids.are these serious?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Traub
Fertility Medicine 19 years experience
Sometimes: Fibroids are common. They occur when part of the uterus grows too much, but they are not cancer. Fibroids can be small or large, can occur in different parts of the uterus. Sometimes they may cause bleeding, pain, infertility or miscarriage. Sometimes they cause no problems at all. It is important to discuss that with your doctor to see if there is anything you need to worry about.

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