A 45-year-old male asked:
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my dad had a mi 3mths later on ecg the report said inferolateral st sagging and 'surprisingly no q wave' what does this mean?

1 doctor answer
Dr. Elizabeth Wallen
34 years experience Pediatrics
Pathological q waves: Are changes commonly seen on the EKG after a heart attack. They reflect an area of damage or scarring. Usually they are a permanent change on the EKG, But sometimes they disappear. That's why the report said " surprisingly no q waves".
Answered on Mar 19, 2017
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Dr. Anita Prakash
28 years experience Cardiology
One can have a heart attack and an "electrically silent" EKG. Furthermore, there can be evolution of infarct patterns on EKGs and last, typically "q wave ECGs" refer to infarcts involving transmural wall thickness. Not all heart attacks are transmural. Famously, non-Q-wave infarcts are considered worse prognostically and/or correlate with more extensive CAD. Q and non-Q are old nomenclature.
Aug 30, 2014

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