A 36-year-old male asked:
Disclaimer

backside of my heel (upper portion) near achilles feels really tight when flexing my toes upward.

2 doctor answers
Dr. Tariq Niazi
42 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
That could be very -: Much a normal thing. You are stretching the achilles tendon and other structures around the back of the heel and ankle by dorsiflexing (or extending) the toes. Keep doing it and gradually you'll feel its getting less ; less tight, over a period of several weeks. If its painful, then therapy would help with massage, us or supervised stretching exercises. Good luck.
Answered on Nov 20, 2013
Dr. Steven Sheskier
38 years experience Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Surgery
Tendon(s) to toes: There are a group of tendons behind the ankle in front of the achilles tendon that are stretched when you lift your toes up taht can give you this sensation. Also the achilles tendon and its muscles are working to prevent the ankle from going up with the toe motion.
Answered on Nov 20, 2013

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month

Related questions:

A 35-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Bowman
37 years experience Podiatry
Depending o age: This may be normal, the part not walking with full pressure on foot. To stretch achilles bend foot up toward leg until they resist and hold for about ... Read More
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
27 years experience Podiatry
Don't believe so: Plantarflexion would not strain the Achilles, it may cause contraction but don't believe would cause any injury in a static position.
1
1 thank
A member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
27 years experience Podiatry
You may of : Overcompensated and now have both achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis. Stretching exercises are good for these problems. Wearing a night splint ... Read More
1
1 thank
A member asked:
Dr. Scott Keith
43 years experience Podiatry
Compensation....: Limping for months, with or without pain, can cause a change in the mechanics of your normal walk. This is known as compensatory change or compensatio ... Read More
1
1 thank

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month