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A 32-year-old member asked:

Choking feeling when i run. is that just my throat or is it asthma?

3 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Joel Selter
Pediatric Allergy and Asthma 37 years experience
Could be!: Could be. I would suggest seeing a pulmonary or allergy specialist and have pfts. Don't forget about possible cardiac problem especially if the initial evaluation does not pan out.
Dr. Joseph Woods
Pathology 28 years experience
Cold air when running or just outside could also be a trigger.
Apr 4, 2012
Dr. Frank Holmes
Sports Medicine 23 years experience
VCD vs. asthma: Exercise-induced asthma is more common than vocal cord dysfunction but both would have to be considered. Asthma tends to come on during cold/dry weather or may be triggered by allergens such as pollen, grasses or weeds. Vcd may have similar causes. Generally, asthma creates more breathing problems while exhaling, but vcd occurs while inhaling. See your primary care or sports med physican for help.
Dr. Lee Perry
Allergy and Immunology 17 years experience
Possible EIB: You may have exercise induced asthma--i would recommend lung function testing with an exercise challenge to determine if this is the cause.

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Last updated Oct 4, 2016

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