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why do i fall asleep after eating

A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Post Prandial Slump: You may have an increase in blood sugar, followed by Insulin release followed by a decrease in blood sugar - which leaves you feeling tired.

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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michelle Zetoony
17 years experience Sleep Medicine
Few ideas: This can be related to a few things. First, glucose has rapid absorption as do other simple sugars so there is a quick high and then a quick low, oft ... Read More
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Susan Wingo
32 years experience Endocrinology
Avoid sweets: Some people have hormone changes occur after eating sweets that make them drowsy. Most often, these people are on their way to getting diabetes if th ... Read More
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A 30-year-old male asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
Several possiblities: Anytime you lay down you position the stomach at the same level as your throat, and muscular action of the stomach (active after meals) can generate p ... Read More
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Collins
23 years experience Prosthodontics
Snoring: This could be a sleep apnea or it could be primary snoring. You need a sleep test to detirmine what it is. If it is not one of those then using breat ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Wayne Ingram
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Depletion: There is a burst of hormones, catecholamines(adrenalin) and brain neurotransmitters as well as the use of large energy stores. So... A little nap afte ... Read More
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michelle Zetoony
17 years experience Sleep Medicine
Sleep starts: Generally benign and often better known as sleep starts or hynpic jerks. It is the loss or decrease in postural muscle tone as you go to sleep.
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A 33-year-old male asked:
Dr. Joseph Bouvier
24 years experience Pediatrics
See below: These shaking episodes are called myoclonic jerks and occur as we relax. In its simplest form, the myoclonus consists of a jerk followed by a relaxat ... Read More
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A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Fred Gallo
35 years experience Clinical Psychology
???: Wake up right before you fall asleep? People generally are awake before they fall asleep :-). If you mean that you wake up right after falling asleep ... Read More
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. William m Simpson
48 years experience Family Medicine
Warm milk, dull book: Going back to sleep suggestions are the same as for falling asleep. Warm milk, dull book, etc. Insure that sleeping environment is quiet, comfortab ... Read More
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A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Kevin Considine
29 years experience Family Medicine
Try this: Try drinking a glass of milk and putting on a relaxing cd of nature sounds and going to bed in dark bedroom. Sometimes taking 3-6 mg of melatonin help ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Benign usually: Many people have mild limb jerking as they fall asleep. This is nocturnal myoclonus, and is typically benign. The jerks that awaken folks at nite fro ... Read More
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Summers
22 years experience Sleep Medicine
Possible sleep apnea: As you fall asleep (transition from wake to sleep) your muscles of your airway also relaxes. If it relaxes a little, you may snore, more than that an ... Read More
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A 29-year-old female asked:
Dr. Albert Pizzo
59 years experience Family Medicine
Insomnia: Many causes for insomnia. You need to see your doctor for a checkup. You may have a sleep disorder and need to get tested in a sleep clinic.
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A 47-year-old female asked:
Dr. Warren Foster
19 years experience Cardiac Electrophysiology
Not if feel rested: It's usually a good sign, when you fall asleep at night quickly. It means your body is used to getting a good nights rest, at a certain time. Of cou ... Read More
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Use good sleep: Hygiene. 1. Keep a regular bedtime & wakening time (to include weekends). Get up the same time each day, regardless of what time you fell asleep. 2 ... Read More
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sal Aragona
40 years experience Dentistry
Prevention: Being tired all the time may indicated sleep problems that can be life shortening or life threatening. The only way to know if there are serious prob ... Read More
A 30-year-old male asked:
Dr. Justin Nelson
15 years experience Pediatric Dentistry
Motion/heat: you are not alone....back in grad school the best naps I ever had was when I rode the bus. Due to the constant mild motion, monotone sound and the he ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sal Aragona
40 years experience Dentistry
Prevention: Being tired all the time may indicated sleep problems that can be life shortening or life threatening. The only way to know if there are serious prob ... Read More
A 31-year-old male asked:
Dr. Sherin Ibrahim Howett
17 years experience Sleep Medicine
Part of sleeping: The falling sensation or twitch is known as a hypnagogic myoclonic twitch. As your muscles begin to relax in preparation for sleep, your brain senses ... Read More
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10 thanks
A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Irving Harper
34 years experience Internal Medicine
Sleep hygeine: 1.) Make sleeping area conducive to rest by keeping it dark and quiet. 2.) Allow time for 6-8 hrs of sleep 3,) Pattern sleep, Go to bed and wake up at ... Read More
A 22-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ellen Altenburg
30 years experience Pediatrics
REM is later stage: REM sleeps occurs ~ 90 minutes after the onset of sleep. This is the time when intense dreaming occurs.
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Summers
22 years experience Sleep Medicine
Need more info...: You need to see a sleep specialist. If you have significant hypersomnolence, it could be due to something as simple as insufficient sleep, in which c ... Read More
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1 thank

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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Personalized answers
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