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partially collapsed lung symptoms

A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jon Wee
Dr. Jon Wee answered
23 years experience Thoracic Surgery
Shortness of breath: Shortness of breath and pain are the most common symptoms. This requires urgent evaluation.
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Dr. Brian Bezack
17 years experience Pediatric Pulmonology
Short of breath/Pain: The most common symptoms are acute onset of chest pain and shortness of breath. If this were to occur you should seek immediate medical attention and ... Read More
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Dr. Loki Skylizard
19 years experience Thoracic Surgery
Short of breath: Estimated at least 10% spontaneous pneumothorax are asymptomatic. Symptoms if present may include shortness off breath, cough, and/or chest pain. The ... Read More

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A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rajesh Rethnam
22 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Atelectasis: Depends on why it collapsed to begin with. If it was a mass pressing on it, need to remove. If it was because of infection and have a hard covering , ... Read More
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Dr. Pankaj Kulshrestha
38 years experience Thoracic Surgery
Collapsed lung : Depends on the cause of the collapse. Many time lung gets trapped and collapsed, and requires decortication to allow expansion.
A 28-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience Pediatrics
Maybe it will: A partially collapsed lung is due to an air leak from the inside of the lung through the covering of the lung, out into the space between the lung and ... Read More
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Dr. Philip Chao
37 years experience Radiology
Yes: If the cause for the collapse is evaluated, found and treated.
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience Pediatrics
Depends on pressure: When flying with a partly collapsed lung, the leaked air in the chest (between the lung and rib cage) expands as the outside air pressure drops as the ... Read More
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A 19-year-old male asked:
Dr. Robert Pearson-Martinez
19 years experience Pediatric Cardiology
Multiple causes: Common causes include chest trauma (like a car accident or a puncture wound to the chest) or medical procedures (like intubation). It can also occur a ... Read More
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Frank Mayo
47 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
NO: Not a good idea. The airplane air is under prfessure ie pressureized cabin and could increase the ptx while in flight needing emergency chest tube p ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Stephen Siegel
37 years experience Pulmonology
Yes, low pressure: Airline flights typically pressurize cabins to the equivalent of being 5000 feet high. The pressure in the cabin is lower than while on the ground. ... Read More
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A 49-year-old female asked:
Dr. Thomas Heston
28 years experience Family Medicine
Yes: Possibilities include incomplete healing, or recurrent partial collapse, or the onset of arthritis due to the injury. It could also be something compl ... Read More
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A 20-year-old male asked:
Dr. David Earle
30 years experience General Surgery
Could get worse: A simple collapsed lung, also known as a pneumothorax, can turn into a life-threatening condition called a tension pneumothorax. This can be a sudden ... Read More
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A 23-year-old male asked:
Dr. Ronald Ward
Specializes in ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Lung collapse: Unlikely. Pain and shortness of breath. Spontaneous pneumothorax would be rare at your age. exertion related in your age group. Better to just go get ... Read More
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