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is mitral valve prolapse considered heart disease

A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience in Cardiology
No and yes: It comes in all flavors. Mild mvp is considered to be a variant of normal. Severe mvp with severe regurgitation can lead to atrial fibrillation and co ... Read More

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A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Moran
32 years experience in Cardiology
Not really: If it is associated with a loud murmur or a lot of back flow of blood, that is a different story. Just have it followed up by serial echocardiograms ... Read More
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A 54-year-old male asked:
Dr. Dean Giannone
24 years experience in Internal Medicine
Heart valve.: In this context, before your operation you would be categorized as having valvular heart disease. That being said, once the valve is replaced, either ... Read More
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A 54-year-old male asked:
Dr. H Robert Silverstein
Specializes in Cardiology
Very good: you should continue to be followed by your cardiologist every 6-12 months and also if you note any important change in heart-type symptoms. HRS, MD, F ... Read More
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience in Cardiology
?severity: Mvp is a spectrum. Mild mvp is considered a variant of normal and not a disease. Severe mvp can lead to serious complications.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Louis Grenzer
54 years experience in Cardiology
Rarel: Mitral valve prolapse can cause palpitations, shortness of breath, or chest pain but isi seldom fatal. If the valve is leaking severely or if it gets ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mary Callahan
28 years experience in Cardiology
Mitral valve disease: Some types of mitral valve disease is hereditary, but more accurately it may run in families. So often we see people in the same family that have the ... Read More
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience in Cardiology
Rheumatic fever: Causes mitral stenosis (blockage). Any other disease of the mitral valve is considered "non-rheumatic".
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Stern
45 years experience in Cardiology
Sometimes: Like most conditions it is part inherited tendancy and part environment.
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Stern
45 years experience in Cardiology
No: No, the tendency for it is present at birth, so it may have a genetic or womb cause. There is even a correlation with certain finger print patterns. F ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience in Internal Medicine
Yes and no: There are four valves in the heart and a variety of disorders may affect each. Many are benign, but some are progressive and fatal. Specifics will d ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Shabbir Hossain
15 years experience in Internal Medicine
Valve problems: Your heart has valves that control flow between different parts. Different types of conditions can affect those valves, damage their structure and aff ... Read More
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Mitral valve: The mitral valve has to open properly to let blood flow into the left ventricle from the atrium. If it doesn't, we call this stenosis. It has to close ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Brian Mott
28 years experience in Thoracic Surgery
Narrowing: This is a narrowing of the valve opening usually caused by rheumatic fever. It eventually leads to respiratory symptoms and heart failure. Fortunatel ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Yash Khanna
56 years experience in Family Medicine
Mitral Valve Disease: There is no one condition as mitral valve disease, but having said that, these are the common mitral valve conditions 1mitral valve prolapse inthis ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bart Denys
38 years experience in Cardiology
Mitral valve prolaps: I will assume you did not mean effective but harmful :-) when the valve leaflets "prolapse" they bend back and no longer seal, resulting in significan ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gerard Honore
28 years experience in Fertility Medicine
Sure: Many are mothers. It may be advisable for you or not, but you'd expect to be followed by a cardiologist and maybe a maternal-fetal specialist.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Thomas Riney
36 years experience in Pediatrics
Could be but unlikel: Depends on your age and your past medical history.
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Randy Baker
39 years experience in Holistic Medicine
No: Mitral valve prolapse with palpitations can be bothersome and cause anxiety but is generally not dangerous (unless the condition progresses to signifi ... Read More
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Bicuspid: Bicuspid aortic valve disease can go lifelong without causing a problem but in some people does progress to aortic stenosis, insufficiency or both. It ... Read More
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Frank Mayo
47 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
No: Mitral vlve prolapse can lead to mitral regurgitation of significance in rare cases, diseases of the left heart can produce mitral regurgitation of ... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bart Denys
38 years experience in Cardiology
Aortic Valve: The aortic valve functions as a valve -no surprise here-. So it can either leak or be restricted (stenotic). Both conditions, when severe, need to be ... Read More
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A 76-year-old female asked:
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience in Pediatrics
MitralValve stenosis: There are 4 valves in the heart. The mitral valve is between the left atrium and left ventricle, and is the valve most often damaged by rheumatic hear ... Read More
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