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A 39-year-old member asked:

why proteins are hard to digest ?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Thomas Namey
Rheumatology 48 years experience
Proteins not hard to: Proteins\ are not hard to digest. They require stomach acid and normal pancreatic function, but if those are normal, they are not hard to digest. However, fats are harder and take longer to digest. If you eat fatty meat as a protein source, it will take longer!

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A 21-year-old member asked:

What proteins are important in addiction?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Emily Lu
Dr. Emily Luanswered
Family Medicine 7 years experience
BDNF, NF-KB & more!: Since addiction involves multiple pathways in the brain and substantially cell-level changes, many proteins are under investigation for their involvement in addiction. A couple interesting ones include bdnf (a neurotrophic factor, i.e. A protein that helps neurons grow & alters their function) and nf-kappa b (a protein involved in the innate immune system, which may be activated during addiction).
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A 34-year-old member asked:

How are proteins related to alzheimer's?

3 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mariana Dangiolo
Geriatrics 29 years experience
Alzheimer's Proteins: In alzheimer's disease, two proteins are known to accumulate and build up in the brain. One protein called amyloid β aggregates into large disruptive ‘plaques’, while tau protein forms tangled fibres within nerve cells. This excessive acummulation of proteins in the neurons eventually lead to the memory problems and cognitive decline seen in alzheimer’s.
A 30-year-old member asked:

What are the benefits of whey protein?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Rishi Kumar
Dr. Rishi Kumaranswered
Anesthesiology 8 years experience
Bioavailability: Whey protein (especially the hydrosylate and isolate processed variants) contain abundant amounts of branched chain Amino Acids in proportions compatible with the human body's needs. These serve as potent stimulators of protein synthesis and tend to be more bioavailable than traditional sources of protein (beans, legumes, etc. This is one of the reasons they're utilized by nutrition enthusiasts.
A 46-year-old member asked:

How much protein is necessary after a hard workout?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Andrew Carroll
Dr. Andrew Carrollanswered
Family Medicine 25 years experience
Depends: It depends on your body's demand, as well as whether your intention is to build muscle mass. Protein is used for enzymatic development as well as muscle build. You should adjust your protein intake based on those needs.
A 33-year-old member asked:

How much protein should my 9 month old be getting from solids?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Not enough to count: A 9 month-old baby still gets most of his nutrition from breastmilk or formula. The baby foods and mashed up adult foods supply some extra calories, some of which is protein, but it's not worth counting the grams. The baby should try different flavors for fun, but he doesn't need to think of solid foods as a very important part of his diet until after his first birthday.

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Last updated Sep 27, 2013
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