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A 43-year-old member asked:

how is manic depression different from bipolar disorder?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Douglas Bey
Psychiatry 57 years experience
Same thing: Manic depression is the old term 4 the same illness.
Dr. Andrew Berry
Clinical Psychology 14 years experience
NOT REALLY: The terms are interchangable. Bipolar I and bipolar II, In the first, manic phases are more severe, and in the second, depressive phases are more severe. There is also cyclothymia which is a low grade version of bipolar disorder in general, where mood swings are not as severe in either direction, manic or depressive. No one knows how it develops, other than a mystery of genetic confluence.

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A 43-year-old member asked:

How do I know if I have postpartum depression?

6 doctor answers15 doctors weighed in
Dr. Stephen Scarantino
Obstetrics and Gynecology 26 years experience
You may not know...: It is easy to feel overwhelmed as a new mother--reach out! i would recommend speaking with your obstetrician or social worker at the hospital you had delivered at and informing him/her of your current state of mind and how you are feeling. You should not feel ashamed to talk with your family or doctor about how you are feeling nor should any of your symptoms be dismissed or taken lightly.
A member asked:

What are the symptoms of postpartum depression?

8 doctor answers20 doctors weighed in
Dr. Sue Hall
Dr. Sue Hallanswered
Pediatrics 38 years experience
Sad and tired: If you find yourself constantly exhausted, unable to sleep, sad at a time when you should be happy with your new baby, not interested in eating, having mood swings, worrying or thinking about harming your baby, you could have postpartum depression. This occurs in 10-20% of women within the first few months after birth. It's more likely if you've had depression before or are under stress.
A member asked:

What are the risk factors for postpartum depression?

2 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. David Fein
Specializes in Preventive Medicine
Depression history: The most common risk factors for post-partum depression are a previous or current treatment for clinical depression, or a family history of clinical depression. However, many women with no risk factors may see their "baby blues" progress to something more...And they should not hesitate to contact their OB for treatment.
A 36-year-old member asked:

How do I know if I am at risk for postpartum depression?

3 doctor answers11 doctors weighed in
Dr. Padmavati Garvey
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Risk factors: Some risk factors would be history of depression in the past. Not having a supportive partner or family.
A 35-year-old member asked:

What are the barriers to getting professional help for postpartum depression?

3 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Carla Enriquez
Pediatrics 50 years experience
Recognition: Too many people don't see the severity of ppd, or play it down as "baby blues." PPD is common and can be severe. If there is a personal or family history of ppd, depression or anxiety in pregnant woman, then the subject should be brought up regularly with the obstetrician or midwife. Be aware there are numerous help site for this condition. http://www.ppdsupportpage.com/.

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Last updated May 14, 2015
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