A 23-year-old male asked:
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how long does it take food to get to the stomach. to the small intestine. to the large intestine n back out?

5 doctor answers
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Variable: To the stomach: 15 seconds. To the small intestine: 60 minutes to several hours. To the large intestine and evacuation: 24-72 hours but all of the above is variable and depends on what you eat, your state of hydration, meds you take, your habits, age, health, and other factors.
Answered on Aug 19, 2014
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Dr. Donald Jacobson
A Verified Doctor answered
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GI transit varies Greatly.: In the absence of any blockage any food that you eat will go immediately into your stomach as you can tell when you swallow. Gastric transit time varies considerably depending upon the gender of the individual the make up of the food, whether or not the person has diabetes, and even the reproductive status of an individual. If it is determined to go to slow that is called gastro paresis. The food gets hung up in the stomach and is not pass on into the small intestine. Once in the small intestine the food is mixed with enzymes and just turned into a mixture called ch ym e. After that this mixture moves into the large intestine where much of the water is removed and it mixes with bacteria and is then expelled through the rectum and anus as stool. In a normal person this can take between 12 and 48 hours for the whole process to occur. Slowed intestinal transit time is considered anything over 72 hours.
Answered on Oct 8, 2018
Dr. Gerald Mandell
51 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Variable: Bowel transit is variable from one individual to another.Transit from mouth to stomach is usually quite rapid. Complete stomach emptying is between 90 and 120 minutes. From mouth to large bowel transit can vary from 30 minutes to several hours. Exit out of large bowel can vary from 12 - 14 hours to 36 - 48 hours. This transit varies not only between individuals but also in the same individual.
Answered on Jun 8, 2019
Dr. Klaus d Lessnau
35 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Range: There is a wide range, for example 6 hours to 24 hours for all. Stomach sometimes one hour but could be more or less. Transit time varies a lot.
Answered on Jun 8, 2019
Dr. Hal Blatman
40 years experience Pain Management
Normal transit time: In general, we should poop as many times per day as we eat. In-to-out transit time should be 8-12 hours. Dinner today should be out in the morning for a healthy gut that is working as it should, and being treated to food it should see. Transit time may be decreased with too much red meat, sugar, wheat, potato, and pain medication.
Answered on Jun 8, 2019
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