A 43-year-old member asked:
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tooth extraction, how long before teeth shift back?

2 doctor answers
Dr. Gary Sandler
53 years experience Dentistry
It varies widely!: Sometimes we see shifting in a matter of weeks or months, while other times it takes years. Every circumstance is different and we can't always predict what will happen nor when. Generally speaking, the sooner teeth are replaced the better. Your own dentist can probably give you a more accurate guess.
Answered on Aug 16, 2017
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Dr. Aaron Cregger
14 years experience Dentistry
Retention necessary: When a tooth is lost an immediate loss of space can be had, without a replacement such as implant, bridge, or partial this space could be lost forever (without orthodontic intervention) the teeth without help may never return to there pre-extraction position.
Answered on Sep 10, 2013

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The same day.: Your teeth begin to shift as soon as there is a change in the bite. You may not see it right away, but the process begins immediately.
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