U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
A 48-year-old member asked:

what is the probability of a child getting lupus if a parent has it?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ronald Krauser
Rheumatology 52 years experience
Unlikely: While there is a degree of hereditary predisposition to lupus, the risk of a child developing it in this situation remains low.
Dr. Robert Lowe
Pediatric Rheumatology 17 years experience
Fairly low: Systemic lupus erythematosus is a complex genetic disease meaning that there are many genes that may affect risk(over 80 known so far) and only a handful of these genes is likely to have a change that increase risk for lupus in any one person. An environmental component is also a major factor (often virus or other unknown triggers),In identical twins, if one has lupus most often the other doesn't.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits
$15 per month

Similar questions

A 23-year-old member asked:

What skills do I need to possess as a parent of a disabled child?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Nadu Tuakli
Family Medicine 41 years experience
It depends: There are various forms of 'disability' and so it depends on what kind of disability your child has in terms of parenting. Disabilities can be physical, mental and emotional. The department of social services may be able to give you more specific information and direct you resources in your community specific to your child's needs.
A 41-year-old member asked:

What do I need to talk to my doctor about as a parent of a disabled child?

3 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Amster
Specializes in Pediatrics
Everything: Parents of a disabled child are going to know way more about medicine than they should. They are also going to have a myriad of questions and concerns about things that may never even occur to the doctor to bring up, but might be extremely important, like logistics, mainstreaming in school, iep's, social issues, behavior training, potty training, and much more. Nothing, nothing, is off limits.
Dr. Judy Orton
Dr. Judy Orton commented
Pediatrics 35 years experience
Make it a practice to make a list of questions and concerns to discuss with your child's doctor(s) at every visit. Keep your own medical file to keep track of important diagnoses, test results, mess, etc - this will help facilitate care among the primary doc, specialists, therapists, teachers. Check in with the primary doc to make sure all involved has forwarded their reports - including school.
Dec 25, 2011
Dr. Charlene Sojico
Pediatrics 41 years experience
Each child is different, may have the same disability but different needs. Whatever concerns you , bring it up for discussion, there is no limit at all!
Jan 20, 2012
A 42-year-old member asked:

Do I need to go to special classes as a parent of a disabled child?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine 31 years experience
No but learn a lot: No you don't need to go to special classes but you should try to learn as much as possible from many sources. Support groups (check with your local hospital and doctor's office), disease specific associations, the internet (as long as it is a reputable, physician-reviewed website), etc.
A 41-year-old member asked:

How do I cope as a parent of a disabled child?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine 31 years experience
Talk to others: Coping with a disabled (or "differently-abled") child can be difficult if you do it alone. Gather as much information as possible about the disability. Seek assistance through support groups from your local hospital or doctor's office, national organizations or the internet (research the credibility of the website.) talk with friends, counselors, your physician, and clergy for support.
A 32-year-old member asked:

Where can I seek support as a parent of a disabled child?

4 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Johnnie Strickland Jr
Family Medicine 33 years experience
Support Groups: Your pediatrician/family physician should be able to steer you toward support groups. You can also google for groups in your area that can provide you with suggestions in many of the areas you need.

Related questions

A 46-year-old member asked:
1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
A 38-year-old member asked:
1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
A 42-year-old member asked:
1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
A 28-year-old female asked:
1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits
$15 per month
Last updated May 31, 2014

People also asked

Connect with a U.S. board-certified doctor by text or video anytime, anywhere.
24/7 visits
$15 per month

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.