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A 66-year-old female asked:

what is the latest breakthrough for a-fib?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gregory Hines
Family Medicine 24 years experience
Pradaxa: I assume you mean pradaxa, which is a new anticoagulant medication, that is given to prevent strokes from atrial fibrillation. It does not require the constant monitoring of coumadin, (warfarin) and is thus less intrusive to the patient, but is also more expensive at this time. That should improve in time.
Dr. John Garner
Cardiology 16 years experience
Rotors: The answer already given is correct; there are several new drugs to treat the stroke risk. There is also a new ablation strategy just about to be deployed known as rotor ablation. It targets a different aspect of the process that keeps atrial fibrillation going. This is an approach entirely unlike that we've used for the last 10 years. Stay tuned!

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A 30-year-old member asked:

I have chronic uncontrollable afib. How can I manage my condition?

3 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jerry Routh
Internal Medicine 46 years experience
RF Ablation: Atrial fibrillation is a rapid irregularly irregular heart rhythm. Therapy is aimed at controlling the heart rate and giving anticoagulants to prevent thrombotic emboli and stroke. The rate can usually be controlled with medicine such as digoxin, beta blockers and calcium channel blockers. Recurrences are treated with antiarrythmics. If still uncontrolled then rf ablation and pacing is used.
IL
A 47-year-old female asked:

47 on propaphenpne tid afib.What is better?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Samuel Hahn
Cardiology 28 years experience
Relativity: There are no perfect treatments for af. The most effective, amiodarone, unfortunately has the most serious long term toxicity. The problem with all other meds (except simple beta blockers and calcium blockers) is that they can cause other, more life threatening arrhythmias. The most important risk factor is the presence of cad. Other than that, trial and error is the best bet (with exceptions).
A 66-year-old member asked:

How do you treat cabal afib?

3 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ryan Stanton
Emergency Medicine 18 years experience
Medications and such: It depends on if it is chronic or just intermittent. If it is rare, they may just watch it. If it is fast or long lasting, then there are medications that help regulate the heart. It is also good to avoid tobacco, caffeine, and stimulants.
A 66-year-old member asked:

Do you treat vagal afib differently?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Carla Enriquez
Pediatrics 50 years experience
Than others?: Yes, a fib can occur for many reasons. If the cause is vagal overstimulation, then treatment is different than if af was post-op, or due to sick cardiac muscle, or adrenergic overactivity. See http://www.A-fib.Com/vagala-fib.Htm#1.
Calhoun, GA
A 33-year-old female asked:

Can gulping a very cold drink quickly trigger afib?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Strader
Cardiology 22 years experience
Yes: I've seen this before, actually. Sudden cold in the esophagus can trigger extra heart beats (pac's), which then can trigger afib. For people prone to triggered heart arrhythmias, it is important to minimize your exposure to your particular triggers. Common triggers include stress, caffeine, chocolate, alcohol, lack of sleep, sleep apnea, and sometimes sugar or environmental (e.g., cold).

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Last updated Apr 2, 2014

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