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A 49-year-old female asked about a 17-year-old female:

A question about my 17 year old. she played competitive sports for years and never had a problem with shortness of breath. now,dr. thinks she could have asthma. no wheezing. just some shortness of breath that started yesterday. thoughts?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Yvette Kratzberg
Pediatrics 24 years experience
There are several viruses that cause inflammation of the bronchioles/bronchi and can lead to wheezing. Asthma is a chronic problem which involves more than one episode of wheezing. If your child has had several episodes of this wheezing and shortness of breath, then the diagnosis is justified. Occasionally other wheezing and shortness of breath are treated with the same meds as Asthma.
Dr. Amrita Dosanjh
Pediatric Pulmonology 36 years experience
Exercise induced bronchospasm may occur and often presents with shortness of breath and chest tightness. Recurrent cough without wheezing may also indicate asthma. The use of Albuterol and improvement of the symptoms supports the diagnosis of asthma. Pulmonary evaluation and an allergy panel may provide additional information. Cardiac disease is another consideration.

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Last updated Apr 24, 2021

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