U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
CT
A 24-year-old female asked:

what are some otc labor inducing pills?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jan Lei Iwata
Ophthalmology 26 years experience
Dangerous thoughts!: Call your doctor first! No one should be inducing their own labor. It's dangerous to Mom & Baby. There is nothing OTC. It requires carful monitoring of both vital signs to protect both lives. Also, it comes IV, so no pharmacy sells it. If you are in pain, you must call your doctor.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
$30 per visit with
membership

Similar questions

A 27-year-old member asked:

What are some exercises I can do in preparation for labor?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeff Livingston
Obstetrics and Gynecology 22 years experience
Daily walk: A daily walk is my favorite exercise for pregnant patients. Getting outside and walking for 20-30 min a day helps keep your muscles loose, burns calories, increases your metabolism and helps you sleep better a night. Stretching and prenatal yoga can also help prepare your muscles for labor.
A 43-year-old member asked:

Do I need to call the hospital and let them know I am in labor?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Amy Herold
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Yes: It is always a good idea to call the hospital and let them know you are coming in. They will be able to have a room prepared for you and have your paperwork ready by the time you get there. If there are space issues they will also have time to do some rearranging so that you don't have to wait. All good things!
A 44-year-old member asked:

How do doctors know if I am in labor?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Nicholas Fogelson
Specializes in Gynecology
Cervical change: Labor is defined as cervical change in the presence of regular uterine contractions. Slow cervical change < 1 CM per hour is considered latent labor, while faster cervical change is considered active labor. Active labor typically onsets at about 4 CM of dilatation, but this can vary.
A 38-year-old member asked:

Am I allowed to eat while in labor?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jessica Scotchie
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
No: Most women are not allowed to eat while in labor, other than clear liquids. The reason is that if your baby is not tolerating labor and a cesarean section is performed, it is dangerous to administer anesthesia to someone who was just eaten. There’s a chance she can vomit during the surgery and aspirate gastric liquid into the lungs which can cause an infection.
Dr. Jessica Scotchie
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Provided original answer
Catie, thanks for your comment. While you are correct inthat true stat c-section is not common, the difficult part is knowing when a c-section may be needed in relation to when someone eats. For all other surgeries, anesthesiologist require patients to have no solid food, for at least 6-8 hours, due to the concern about aspiration. To prevent dehydration and exhaustion, we usually give women IV fluids in labor, which can include glucose, to make sure that she is getting some calories and electrolytes while laboring.
May 13, 2011
A 30-year-old member asked:

Is it true that orgasms can spur labor?

3 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Padmavati Garvey
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
No: No under normal circumstances and for women with no medical or obstetrical problems it should not be an issue.

Related questions

A 50-year-old member asked:
1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
A 46-year-old member asked:
1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
$30 per visit with
membership
Last updated Nov 13, 2015

People also asked

Related topics

Connect with a U.S. board-certified doctor by text or video anytime, anywhere.
$30 per visit with
membership

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.